Tuesday, December 8, 2015

New Hooked X's and Ancient Runes Found in Old Icelandic Manuscripts

 
This Hebrew alphabet contains the Hooked X symbol for "aleph" and is from an old Icelandic manuscript that dates to between 1700-1890. 
 
 
This secret coded alphabet contains an unmistakable Hooked X symbol for the letter "a."  It's one of several hundred alphabets from old Icelandic manuscripts that date between 1750-1850. 
 
 
This alphabet contains what looks like another Hooked X symbol for the letter "a."  This Icelandic manuscript dates to between 1700-1890.


This alphabet from 1780 contains yet another apparent Hooked X symbol for "a."


These are only nine of at least one hundred and twenty examples of the "X" symbol being used for the letter "a."  Below is the only example I had previously seen of the "X" symbol used for "a" in a secret coded alphabet from a 15th Century Cistercian Germanic manuscript I published in my "Hooked X" book in 2009. 


Two examples of complicated sigil drawings from the Icelandic manuscripts that incorporate runes and Masonic box code symbols (left), and a heavily Christian influenced drawing (right) that were both used for witchcraft and ritual magic.

 

These sigil drawings incorporate heavy Masonic symbolism (left) and what appear to be two Hooked X symbols in the upper right part of the upper arm (right).


One of the two Larsson Papers, dated to 1883 and 1885, using the same pentadic numbering system as found on the Kensington Rune Stone, which also contains two runic alphabets written in the "Secret Style."  These alphabets which include the Hooked X for "a", along with the alphabetic box code were clearly Masonic and prove the Larsson Papers are related to both known medieval Cistercian secret coded alphabets and the recently published Icelandic secret alphabets that lean heavily on ancient runes.



These two examples of the Hooked X are found in medieval Icelandic manuscripts from 14th (Right, 1300-1400) and 15th Centuries (Left, 1490-1510). 


This circa 6th century Anglo-Saxon brooch with eight symbols carved into the outer ring include a Hooked X at the 2:00 o'clock position.  It was excavated next to a skull in Old Hunstanton, in Norfolk, England in 1900.

Little did I realize that while on my trip to Rhode Island for the dedication of the new home for the Narragansett Rune Stone, I was just being introduced to the tip of an important iceberg of new information that is going to rock the skeptics, debunkers, and disbelievers of the five North American rune stones with the Hooked X, to their core.  Before the ceremony started, Steve DiMarzo and Valdimar Samuelsson visited briefly with me concerning a recently discovered cache of Icelandic manuscripts dating back to the tenth Century that contained literally hundreds of secret coded alphabets, many using unique and mysterious runes.  Since the dedication, Steve, with his dogged determination has been scouring every page of every manuscript, and Valdimar, with his historical knowledge of the use of runes in Iceland, and ability to read the Icelandic text, has led to several important discoveries.  As of this past weekend, Steve has already found 120 examples of secret alphabets that use the “X” symbol for “a”, as well as all the runes on the Narragansett Rune Stone. 


A couple days after initially posting this blog, I received additional information from Valdimar after he had researched the history of the use of runes in Iceland.  He then sent me the following:
 
"Scott, after reading on runes, especially from the book ‘’Galdrar á Íslandi‘‘, chapter ‘‘Rúnir og rúnagaldrar‘‘, by Matthías Viðar Sæmundsson, he says: Scholars have denied that use of runic letters in Iceland were used as much as Björn M Olsen claimed. Olsen (14 July 1850 – 16 January 1919) was an Icelandic scholar and politician.  If he is right, then Runic letters have been used from the time of early settlement, around 870, to what we call brennuöld 1674 when they burned people with runic knowledge.  In 1641 another scholar ‚‘‘Jon The Learned‘‘, said that many runic books had been in use before our famed Snorri Sturluson (1179 – 23 September 1241).  He wrote most of our Icelandic sagas some believe from old rune books.  Based on this, it is only the mainland European academics, both then and today, who deny that Iceland had, in fact, used runes even longer than written in this book.  Now we see evidence today this is true with all these manuscripts dated after those claims mentioned here."
 
 
This is important new information as it shows the ongoing attempts by scholars to stubbornly maintain an untenable position about not only the continued use of runes (and the Hooked X) which began in at least the 9th Century, by individuals and secret societies not only in Iceland, but no doubt in mainland Scandinavia and other parts of Europe. 
 


What has me excited is they have also found at least two undeniable examples of the Hooked X symbol being used for the letter “a.”  One of these two alphabets uses the Hooked X as the symbol for “aleph”, the first letter in the Hebrew alphabet.  This alphabet might be the most exciting of all because it provides a direct link between the same Hooked X seen on five North American rune stones, with Hebrews in Jerusalem where we recently found the Hooked X on the lid of the “Yeshua, son of Joseph” ossuary in the Talpiot Tomb.  Is this conclusive evidence of a link between the sect of Jesus and his followers in the First Century, and the Templars who carved the five North American rune stones?  Not yet, but this alphabet in particular is a huge piece of evidence that is consistent with this thesis.

 

I consulted with a friend in Arizona named Ed Martinez, a Freemason and an Eastern Mystic, who looked at some the manuscripts with complicated symbols using ligatures and offered the following insights, “They are complicated symbolic instructions for magic, incantations, and rituals that were very Christianized, yet retained Pagan traits.  These are sigil drawings using ancient Germanic and Nordic runes for witchcraft and ritual magic.”  He also said, “There are obviously Hebrew influences along with both Pagan and neo-Pagan ritual influences, and also very clear Masonic connections.”  Ed also pointed out there are both Nordic/Swedish and Germanic influences in the manuscripts which we also have within the Kensington Rune Stone inscription.  According to Samuelsson, "These coded “invisible” alphabets and complex ritual magic symbols were used for centuries by certain groups of people in Iceland, but were hidden away when Bishop Odd Einarson made it illegal to use runes.  In 1625, the Roman Catholic Church began burning people who used witchcraft runes."  Considered heretical by the Church, these documents were hidden from Church authorities only to surface again now for the world to see.  There is a lot of research to be done on these documents, but even with this initial study some incredible new knowledge is coming to light.      

 

It’ll be interesting to see what scholars like Henrik Williams, Professor of Runology in Sweden, will say about these mysterious runic alphabets.  He is already on record saying the Hooked X is modern despite being aware of numerous examples that date back at least two millennia.  The Larsson Papers, which first surfaced in early 2004, contained similar secret alphabets with the Hooked X and proved scholars for the past century were wrong that the Hooked X never existed.  Instead of admitting it, they claimed an immigrant could have had these documents and carved the KRS inscription.  Never mind that you still couldn’t carve the KRS with the Larsson Papers, the consistent position of Williams and his colleagues is to ignore hard science and maintain the KRS is a hoax at all costs.  These newly published Icelandic alphabets and the other documented examples prove definitely the Hooked X is not only medieval, but is the key to amazing hidden history whose time has come to be revealed.

 

My guess is the linguists will stubbornly remain entrenched in the foxhole of denial that to date has been rooted in non-scientific thinking and arrogance.  I would love nothing more than to see them prove me wrong.  For those interested, the manuscripts can be viewed here: http://handrit.is/en/ 


     

272 comments:

  1. Scott,

    We know that both Knights Templar and Sephardic Jewish refugees were welcomed in Scotland. There were also islands in NE Scotland that were still speaking Norse until, really, the Modern Period. Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism) was quite strong in Medieval Iberia, where the Sephardim lived. Is it possible that the mixing of Templar and Kabbalah practices first occurred in Medieval Scotland then relocated to Iceland?

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  2. Mountain Lion,

    I see no reason why they couldn't have and the presence of Jewish symbolism, and the Hooked X, within the manuscripts supports this idea. It also makes sense for any group being persecuted to get as far away from your enemies as possible. Next to North America, Iceland is about as far away from Rome as it gets back in those days.

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  3. In case, you didn't realize it . . . Mountain Lion is a certain Georgia architect, you know from Christmas's past . . . specifically December 21, 2012.

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  4. There are less than 100 Jews currently living in Iceland and literally no synagogues. Zero. Iceland unfortunately has a very bad history of anti-semitism, having actually turned over in the late 1930s the few Jews that lived in Iceland to the Danes and eventually the Nazis.

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    1. Anonymous,

      Source? In any case, even a small group of Jews could easily account for the Jewish influences we see in the manuscripts.

      Delete
  5. Mountain Lion,

    Ahh... Very nice to hear from you. Glad to see you're keeping up on the latest findings that one way or another dovetail with your research. Keep up the good work!

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  6. Though some of your new hooked X's are more "hooked" than your past examples, the ones you provide above where it would stand for a letter A do not predate the alleged 1362 dating for the KRS. In fact, they provide additional evidence that there were modern sources for having the hooked X represent the letter A on the KRS given your stated range of dating; thus making it more likely for it to have been carved closer to the year of its discovery. You seem to be debunking your own prior conclusions with this new evidence. As for Professor Williams, I suppose he'll likely view your evidence as I do, which would seem to be the more logical determination.

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    1. Joe,

      You just don't want get it do you? Since the Hooked X existed two thousand years ago, it didn't disappear and obviously survived to this very day. So of course it existed into the late 19th Century, but your inability to accept this fact, or outright denial, that it existed the whole time is simple dishonesty on your part.

      I have said repeatedly and will it say it again, the weathering work I performed is consistent with over 500 years as are all aspects of the inscription including the Hooked X.

      It would be nice if Professor Williams would start by admitting he was wrong about the Hooked X being invented by the “forger” when the Larsson Papers proved it existed all along within a 19th Century society as I’ve said all along. We both know that will not happen, so if we can't trust him to acknowledge that simply fact, why should we trust anything he says?

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    2. No, what I presented above was honestly set forth as well as soundly reasoned. Hurling insults on your part is no proper response. I will however entertain your points so long as you are willing to entertain mine.

      You are obviously piling onto the Larsson Papers as if they support you. Yet your only basis for this is to link them to tenuous "secret societies", as if that somehow makes your hooked X represent a letter A in anything other that what has been established as relatively modern sources for same. As evidence, you also submit your weathering conclusions for dating the KRS, which is rather circular in reasoning, as it is the very thing you are trying to further establish as authentic. To this point, you claim your studies put the KRS carving at 500 years prior to its discovery. In fact, your own weathering conclusions only put it back to over 200 years prior. To get to 500 years you took the date from the KRS itself as if it were somehow logical to rule out countless other possibilities and self-authenticate the very thing at issue; which of course is undoubtedly more circular reasoning on your part.

      Putting aside that your weathering data methodology was not peer reviewed in any of the numerous geological, scientific periodicals that exist, and has yet to be replicated by other scientists in your field... which is quite a bit to put aside... you cannot account for what was done to the KRS in over a century, whether manually, chemically or naturally, before you got your hands on it to discount all the variables involved.

      As for your continued attack on Professor Williams, he has not accepted your conclusions for very well stated grounds. To assert he is wrong on one point and must be wrong on all others, is a standard I don't think you truly wish to apply universally; or more particularly, in your own case.

      As an aside, I would like to pose a question to you. If you were faced with a modern stone carving, would you know how to use science and your geological skills to artificially age it? Do you have this expertise?

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    3. Joe,

      We now have 14th and 15th Century examples of the Hooked X in the Icelandic manuscripts, a 7th Century Anglo Saxon broach, five North American rune stones, the 18th Century Copiale cipher, the Cremona Document examples from the 12th Century, Columbus' sigla, Rosslyn Chapel in the 15th Century, Santa Maria de Olival Church in the 12th Century, Westford Knight site, and of course the Hooked X on the Yeshua ossuary in the Talpiot Tomb that dates back to the First Century. I suppose you and Williams will say they are all fake?

      Framing the argument to claim only the peer review process that you designate is acceptable simply isn't going to fly here.

      Even if what allegedly happened to the KRS since its discovery di happen, it would not affect mine or Winchell's work as I have said repeatedly in the past.

      Further, a runologist like Williams is in no position to comment on anyone's geological work so his opinion is irrelevant, and so is yours as long as you maintain a close-minded attitude.

      To accuse me of name-calling is laughable. You and other debunkers have called me a "pseudo-scientist", "racist", "liar", etc... Until that changes and you start to show even a minimal amount of respect I find it a little hypocritical to accuse me of name-calling don't you think?

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    4. Joe,

      With regard to identifying fakes; I will refer you to pages 110-117 of my Akhenaten book where I proved definitively that a Burrows Cave artifact was a fake. You must have missed episode 12, in season 3, where I scientifically proved an alleged 13th Century carving with a Hooked X that I would loved to have been real, was also a fake. Of course, after my extensive geological laboratory work I also concluded the AVM Stone carving was a fake back in 2002.

      Delete
    5. I was very clear in my comments. You may be able to find what you believe to be hooked X's that predate 1362, though others may not see them as clearly as you do. However, even giving you a bit of leeway here, you have not shown a distinct hooked X that specifically represents the letter A that predates 1362. As I pointed out above, this recent blog post of yours only sets forth more modern examples as a potential source for the hoax. Therefore to cite ancient examples of your hooked X is meaningless unless you can also show that they were meant to represent the letter A; at least as far as the KRS is concerned.

      So a "runologist like Williams is in no position to comment on anyone's geological work so his opinion is irrelevant..."? I don't believe Professor Williams has ever commented on your geological work. No, he has stayed within his well known expertise in regard to Swedish runes. However, if you applied your own maxim to yourself, then your opinion outside of geology pertaining to runes would be irrelevant. Which brings us to Winchell. We've already discussed the fact in prior discussions that although Winchell believed the KRS to be genuine, in his committee report to the Minnesota Historical Society, he left the final say to the Swedish linguists; who time and time again refute the legitimacy of the KRS. Even those linguists who may have been swayed, got off the boat when the Larsson Papers came out; and what you provide above only gives them more modern sources which could have inspired the hoax. Besides, wasn't Winchell fooled by the Brower collection with his weathering work of stone artifacts in his Paleoliths of Kansas? If so, your one and done maxim from our prior exchange above might apply here as well.

      As for your ability to spot fakes, you really can't assert the AVM stone as an example. In your last blog post you admitted that you hadn't completed your investigation, nor had you drafted a report prior to the hoax being admitted to by its makers. But that wasn't quite my question to you. Actually, it wasn't what I asked at all. What I did ask you was whether or not you had the geological/scientific expertise to artificially weather rune carvings. Could you pull it off? Just curiosity on my part.

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    6. Joe,

      It is important to remember the Hooked X represents an ideology, so it is not restricted to being used only for the letter “a.” It has also been used in the Roman numeral 10 like the Cremona Document and in Santa Maria de Olival Church, or as a stand-alone symbol like the Anglo-Saxon broach, the Westford Knight, the Copiale Cipher, in a few examples in the Icelandic manuscripts, and on the Yeshua Ossuary. Therefore, trying to frame the argument the Hooked X is only used “a” as the basis for you claim it is modern is erroneous.

      Professor Williams most certainly did comment on my geological work, and it was in writing. Further, he has tried to make claims about geological aspects of the KRS inscription, specifically regarding the Dotted R and Dotted Thorn runes. He was completely wrong and it was inappropriate for him to overstep his bounds which was driven by his (and Dick Nielsen’s) obsession to control all aspects of the KRS research discussion that for some reason they seem to think they own. The Dotted R and Dotted Thorn runes are 100% man made and runologically prove the KRS is medieval. You can save your fingers and refrain from trying to defend the professor; he simply screwed up on this one.

      You expose yourself even more as completely agenda-driven by bringing up Winchell’s work on the Kansas Native American lithic artifacts. The 2009 paper you refer to is clearly a fake. I find it a bit odd that this fictitious archeologist who allegedly wrote the paper, is conveniently deceased. Further, I find it laughable that any serious person would accept the opinion regarding geological details of the artifacts from an archaeologist over the accomplished former State Geologist of Minnesoota who knew more about Native American cultures and their use of lithics that anyone living today. You might recall he was the author of the classic volume, “Aborigines in Minnesota.” Winchell wasn’t fooled by anyone; this paper was written by someone trying to slander Winchell’s reputation (likely to try to undermine his work on the KRS) and it is you who be the fool if you hitch your wagon to that fraud of a paper.

      Winchell did not leave the final word to the linguists; he rendered his emphatic opinion the KRS was authentic based on geology and his three visits to Kensington, but appropriately deferred to the Scandinavian scholars for input into the inscription. However, as we have stated many times, linguists then and now do not understand the KRS inscription, nor had the integrity to admit it, so his faith in them was sadly miss-placed. .

      Keep in mind that I worked very closely with Williams, Dick Nielsen, and other linguists who taught me an awful lot about medieval runes, dialect, language, grammar and dating. Although I’m obviously not a world expert, I know enough to be extremely dangerous and understand the details pertaining to the KRS as well as anyone.

      What part about the AVM Stone sequence of events don’t you understand? You tried to make up some twisted scenario to make me look bad and you failed; get over it

      As far as artificially aging a test sample to replicate the KRS, I couldn’t do it. Even if successful in recreating all the site conditions, weather variables, etc., I don’t see how one could accelerate five and half centuries of freezing and thawing, and wetting and drying cycles in a near-surface below-grade environment. I’ve thought about this before and discussed it with colleagues and I don’t think it’s possible.

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    7. I'm sorry Mr. Wolter, but you are mistaken in regard to John D. Reynolds' reappraisal of Winchell which appeared in the peer reviewed periodical, The Kansas Anthropologist, 29:1-16. The work was even revisited by Marvin F. Hawley of the Wisconsin Historical Society, the editor of the original publication, in that same periodical, issue 31:1-3. In it, he reexamined the field notes of F.H. Sterns, a Harvard-trained archeologist in regard to his comments critical of Winchell's monograph Paleoliths of Kansas which was used as source material for Reynolds. Do you really believe these very well documented publications are fake? Is there no Hawley or Sterns as well? I find that rather surprising and welcome any evidence of fraud that you have to offer in this regard.

      But don't forget, I read Winchell's committee report to the Minnestota Historical Society, which despite his personal beliefs clearly documented his deference to the Swedish linguists. If Winchell had the Larsson Papers at that time, as well as your findings above documenting even more modern sources for hooked X as a letter A, he may have abandoned ship as well. And make no mistake about it, the issue at hand is very clearly set forth in particular in regard to the hooked X representing the letter A on the KRS. That is the problem the linguists have posed for you that yet remains. All ideology aside.

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    8. Joe,

      You're being completely hypocritical if you think anybody should take the word of any archeologist over an accomplished geologist about specific geological matters as presented in the Reynolds' paper. You've argued ad nausea about how only scholars in specific disciplines have the credibility to render opinion within those disciplines. Now you want to accept archaeologist's opinions about geology over a geologist? Really Joe?

      Fake or not, the timing of this paper is a little too convenient and its scientific content way to “soft” to have any credibility. It comes across as an attempt by people like you to undermine Winchell’s credibility by those who want to attack the authenticity of the KRS.

      You refuse to acknowledge the facts you conveniently set aside and continue repeating the same empty arguments. The Hooked X for “a” is modern horse is dead Joe, get off!

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    9. Please. I can take the name calling, but don't make a straw man out of me and frame my arguments in way not intended or even set forth to begin with. Perhaps you didn't realize that the evidence provided above could be used to bolster Professor Williams and the impact of the Larsson Papers. You should realize it now however, as I've laid it out quite clearly and see no need to do so again.

      Once more, you become inflamed when you see an anthropologist or an archaeologist do their job as if they're intruding upon Geology, yet you have no problem with geologists intruding upon other fields of study in which they have no training nor expertise. Besides, if you believe that both archaeologists and anthropologists have no formal scientific training, you would be in error. You cannot simply label what they do as "soft". They are governed by the same scientific methodology and principles as any other discipline involving same. If you wish to contradict the facts I've made clear for you, or the details of the reports as cited, then by all means do so. Name calling is pure ad hominem, a fallacy. First it was "fake". When that didn't wash, now it is "soft" and I am "hypocritical" on a dead horse. Such fallacious attacks, though perhaps entertaining to partisans, are wholly without meaning.

      As for my acknowledging facts, I have done so with what you have provided and given reasoned interpretations counter to your assessments of same. Yet again and again you attack the maker, not the argument; whether it's my argument or that of qualified individuals in their respective fields of study. Proof by Assertion is not argument, it is yet another fallacy. As what you are basically setting forth is that I must agree to everything you say and do, as if simply by asserting your conclusions you have done so on sound grounds and reasoning. That is simply not how intellectual discourse is conducted. Before we can even get to your conclusions, we must examine your premises and how you got there.

      I have been polite. I have been logical. And most of all, I have been patient. However, I have also stated all I need to in regard to this blog entry and will stand by it accordingly.

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    10. Joe,

      Your responses are like riding a merry-go-round that ends up going nowhere. Let’s do this, I’m going to ask you factual questions and you answer them. I’ll ask three questions and we’ll see if you’re capable of giving a straight answer. If not, then let’s discontinue this discussion and move on with our lives OK? Here we go…

      1. Olof Ohman pulled a 202-pound stone from the roots of an Aspen tree estimated by 12 witnesses to be 25-30 years old with his two oldest sons, Olof Jr. and Edward present.
      2. This stone had a 12-line inscription (9 lines of the face and 3 on the split side) carved primarily in medieval Scandinavian runes, three Latin letters (AVM), and several other mysterious characters.
      3. Olaus Breda and three additional Scandinavian scholars, in 1899, rendered a negative opinion about the authenticity of the inscription after studying two different written copies. One supplied by Olof Ohman and the other by Samuel Siverts.

      Do you accept these facts or not?

      Delete
  7. Perhaps I should have mentioned that almost all the Sephardic Jews in Scotland changed their names to Scottish or Anglo-Saxon words. In fact, most even publicly became Presbyterians, while discretely also observing Jewish holidays. Essentially, they became Messianic Jews, which was no problem for the Presbyterians. Thus, even as late the mid-20th century a Scottish Jewish family could be in Iceland, changed their last name to an Icelandic form, and be known as Christians, but still within their family keep knowledge of their Jewish heritage. This was certainly the case with our Creek Indian heritage in my family.

    POOF is interested in them because many of the Indian traders in the Southeast were Sephardic Jews with Scottish, English or French names. For example, David Crockett was of Sephardic Jewish ancestry.

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    1. Mountain Lion,

      You are quite right about this; I've heard term "Crypto-Jews" used for these people.

      Delete
  8. me thinks MountainLion has much research to maybe share. If not, i'll be line to buy his book .... now back to Janet's and Allen's book ... I really have to look at the monks of the 10-13 centuries in a whole new light. I'm detecting a lot of background innuendos and nuances.....

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  9. ...Steve DiMarzo and Valdimar Samuelsson visited briefly with me concerning a recently discovered cache of Icelandic manuscripts dating back to the tenth Century... quote from above.

    this one is really really going to hurt. They said "it never existed" & "it was made up". In soccer, that's two yellows which equal a red. I guess the "noise makers" are in the bleachers...or tossed off the field into the locker room.

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    1. Williams was dead wrong on both accounts, but instead of admitting it, he comes up with another lame theory debunkers try to propagate.

      What a miserable existence it must be to always see the negative side of everything...

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  10. Dave,

    Mountain Lion has done a lot of interesting work on southeastern Native Americans that you might want to check out.

    The Cistercian and Tironensian monastic orders during that time are at the heart of the hidden history I've been talking about for a long time. You understand them, you understand a huge part of the overall story. Keep reading, there's some good stuff in there!

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  11. Scott,

    Obviously, hooked X's is not what we are researching, but I'd swear I have seen them on Bronze Age Iberian script. Is that my imagination? They are certainly not a 19th century invention.

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    1. Mountain Lion,

      I'm going to post two more Hooked X's from the manuscripts, one each from the 14th and 15th Centuries, to show the debunkers it did indeed exist. They will continue to deny and deflect of course, but the sensible readers will see through the their mental haze.

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  12. The reason that I am so interested in the Bronze Age is that we discovered that several prominent archaeologists found bronze weapons and tools at several Georgia archaeological sites during the latter half of the 20th century. They listed them with other artifacts, but didn't advertise it, because of the fear of the sort of treatment I got in 2012. We also have a quarried stone triangular temple that was formerly located in NE Metro Atlanta and then was relocated to the plantation of a Georgia governor. This type of temple was built on Cyprus between around 2200 BC and 1800 BC. In addition, several of the petroglyphic boulders in the Georgia Gold Belt are identical to Bronze Age petroglyphic boulders in western Iberia and southwestern Ireland. That is why I don't doubt at all your continuing research into Pre-Columbian contacts between Europe and North America.

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    1. Mountain Lion,

      Pretty fascinating stuff; I wonder what will happen when these artifacts and sites are taken seriously?

      Delete
  13. This might be a silly question but how can you tell the difference between a deliberate hook and an unintentional quill flourish? Is it like handwriting analysis where you look at the weight of the ink at points of the letter? Is there that same heavyness (is that a word?) of ink on the X characters as there are with other letters?

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    1. Jeff,

      This is not a silly question at all, and is a point I pondered in every example I've seen. That is why I only posted a few examples of the Hooked X that are unquestionable.

      In some cases, like the nine examples I posted of the "X" for "a" I personally think the "hooks" could very well be flourishing and were not intended to be Hooked X's. However, in the examples I am calling Hooked X's, there is evidence of willful intent by the writer to make a clear and distinct line/hook on the upper right arm of the "X."

      Delete
    2. The X can be traced back to ancient Greece to the X or Chi which represents and symbolizes christ..again ancient..why do people have to be dumb doubters when the evidence is plain as day??

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    3. Cj,

      You have to realize certain soft science scholars and debunkers take the opposing position and refuse to accept any evidence contrary to their firmly entrenched position. It's dishonest argumentation and a waste of our time.

      The facts speak for themselves to those who are willing to listen.

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    4. Scott,

      Got it. So if I come across any similar documents what should I look for as far as evidence of willful intent? Is it purely from the context of what is written or are there physical tell-tale signs? I've kind of been looking at old handwriting examples lately and I think it's fascinating how simple things like spacing, pressure points, amount of ink, etc. can convey so much information about the person doing the writing.

      Delete
    5. Jeff,

      Most of the marks you see are willful with intent. The question is, what is artistic detail and what is necessary to communicate meaning? Context within a word, letter, name, or sentence is important to consider and when possible to determine, who is doing the writing and what they were writing about. Many don't realize that within medieval Cistercian documents the scribe would often make a random dot as an acknowledgement they were thinking about God. Very simple, but very important and meaningful to the scribe.

      In the case of the Hooked X, every example I've found (except the Anglo-Saxon broach) is associated with a secret society over a two millennia period. Those being either the Knights Templar, Knights of Christ, or modern Freemasonry.

      Those are my quick and dirty suggestions.

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  14. So, to get this right.

    1) these two researchers have unearthed ancient and hidden manuscripts in Iceland WHICH contradict the current narrative.

    2) they are in the process of translating and verifying the "language" and translation of the manuscripts.

    3) all documents and people who were involved with "runes" were happily sent to the "land of angels" (being sarcastic) for EVEN KNOWING about runes.

    4) These documents, pics of which are now in your "library", prove that the "hooked X" goes back to the 8th, 9th or 10th centuries.

    5) there is a COMPLETELY hidden and destroyed (mostly) history of Iceland and the current "mainland" historians HAVE REJECTED their own who are in Iceland.

    6) Has anything come up about the missing settlements of Greenland. Since we now have PROOF there was a concentrated policy of suppression all the way back to 1600's (church sponsored) this would open the door and the current BS story of "they starved to death".....

    7) the current story of Greenland was lost to the world because "it was too far" and played no part in the economics of the 11th to 14th centuries, is basically a "fairytale". In reality, no one lost anything and the financial coalitions of Bristol and Portugal were intact and a powerhouse of merchants.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Dave,

    You have items 1-5 correct. I haven't seen anything recently about Greenland, but I suspect these new discoveries might open the door to research in this arena. Rewriting history is still difficult, but the Internet is making it tough for some scholars and debunkers to suppress things like they used to.

    ReplyDelete
  16. What happens when the Bronze Age artifacts and buildings are publicized? There is this wild Norwegian guy up in Minnesota,who likes to shoot funky TV programs about geology and archaeology. I will put in touch with him.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Question Scott

    Didn't Christians flee to Iberia during their period of extreme persecution by Emperor Diocletian (c. 300 AD)? Awhile back I saw a Christian inscription in Iberian script, not the Roman alphabet. It contained some hooked X's, but others were not. I meant to send it to you. I will see if I can find it online again.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Thank you for putting up a new blog heading on this very interesting subject. I had hoped you would introduce something new and significant into the conversation about runes, and especially how they relate to the Kensington Rune Stone.

    Most glaring to me now, is seeing rather dramatically how some hooked x's do actually date back to the time of the KRS, and in Iceland...which is a stop-over on the way to Greenland and on to Vinland.

    Something else about Iceland immediately comes to mind. These mysterious stone holes in rocks. I remember reading somewhere that these same stone holes from medieval Iceland can be found here in America, especially in Minnesota and in nearby S. Dakota.

    So, Scott, we have hooked x's in medieval America and in medieval Iceland, and we also have medieval stone holes in both medieval Iceland and in medieval America.

    We also have 30 sailors/adventurers leaving Norway and Sweden around 1362, headed towards Kensington, Minnesota and beyond. Apparently these Scandinavians were as familiar with hooked x's and stone holes as were their friends in Iceland. Plenty of hooked x's and stone holes to go around back in those days, apparently. Maybe these hooked x's and stone holes aren't that odd, after all.

    One of my favorite hooked x's is the modified version with the diamond in the middle, as seen in Rosslyn Chapel.

    Peyton

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peyton,

      You see the manuscripts as I do; a confirmation the Hooked X is certainly medieval and in truth far older. The stone holes were a way to mark the routes if one knew what to look for. This is exactly how the Templars operated.

      I'm sure it's no coincidence the Hooked X is at Rosslyn. The pieces to the puzzle are flying into place now.

      Delete
  19. Hello Scott,

    I can personally attest to finding examples of the "Hooked X" long before, I became aware of your work. First on a coin inherited by a friend, and several Egyptian examples, where the crook and flail make the "X" and the "stylized beard" forms the "Hook". What I call the "Hooked V" is also present on the same coin, and appears in Egyptian depictions as the crook and flail held in a "V" with the "stylized beard" making the "Hook". I noticed what appears to be the "Hooked V" in the first example you've provided. This symbol also appears carved into a boulder on Hobson Island, and The Copper Scroll of the Dead Sea Scrolls. I still believe the cooper used to make the scroll came from Michigan unless, the "long lost purification technique" hypothesis is correct.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, wasn't the Ancient Hittite language recently deciphered, and these people used the words "bread" and "water" with the same phonetics as we say them today? The only difference being the alphabet used. To me, it sounds like part of the English Language is much older than what we're taught.

    Best regards,

    Anthony Warren

    ReplyDelete
  20. Scott,

    ...never mind the hooked X, is it not the ark of the covanant you are
    really looking to find? many scholars believe that the Ark is indeed in Axum, Etheopia. surely, if you can gain access to dome of te rock, you can gain access to a hole in the ground chuch in Etheopia? why not do real show, actually finding something? ...just saying. btw; if you need ideas fo a futue show might I suggest Bill Murray in: "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissu" (2004) Just Kidding, I accually like your work very much! REALLY!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      Actually, while the Ark would certainly be a cool discovery, it's not that high on my list. As far as finding things, how about the KRS, Bat Creek Stone, Tucson Lead Artifacts, Du Luth Stone, Noman's Land Island Rune Stone, Spirit Pond, Narragansett, Texas Rock Wall...

      In any case, glad you're enjoying the shows and I'd love to team up with Bill Murray. Although, he'd have me laughing so hard I'd NEVER find anything with him!

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your quick response and equally as quick wit. I take it that you did not see the Bill Muurray movie?

      Best of luck to you in all that you seek!



      Delete
    3. I did not see that one, but I'll put it on the list!

      Delete
  21. The value of the X comes from Legio X equestrus commanded by Octavian a.k.a. Augustus. The X in Christian iconorgaphy secretly and metaphorically is a value of St. Andrew who was crucified on an X shaped cross by Legio X soldiers. This is why the story of Constantine and Angus the Pict adapting this symbol is almost identical. The term "Et in Arcadia Ego" refers to St. Andrew and not what all the Rennes le Chateau investigaotors are saying. The AVM of the auspice symbol is the Mary Mag. connection in this hermetic value of the male and female in a single symbol. See: Sepulcher of St. Andrew in Patras, Achaeia, Greece. The Acts of St. Andrew are a metaphor for Jason and the Argonauts and this is all revealed in Fulcanelli who straight up tells you how to find all this stuff if you are capable of understanding. Here's some info for you: http://survivalcell.blogspot.com/p/et-in-arcadia-ego-solved-by-way-of-st.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cort,

      Interesting take that certainly adds to the discussion. More good stuff for those interested in delving deeper.

      What is your take on the "X" and Hooked X in these manuscripts?

      Delete
  22. Scott,

    I’m intrigued by your mention of a 7th Century Anglo Saxon broach containing a Hooked X. Most of the places you’ve mentioned where you’ve seen a Hooked X are, shall we say, impersonal, they are chapels or manuscripts or rune stones. A broach, however, is an item of personal adornment; someone wore that broach at one time. If the Hooked X wasn’t a normal part of the design of Anglo Saxon jewelry and the Hooked X was a central part of the design in this one, someone probably would have wanted it there. Why?

    7th Century Briton was part of the Dark Ages, the Anglo Saxons of that era still hadn’t totally conquered Briton. They were setting up petty Kingdoms, and dynastic houses, in the regions of Briton they did control, they also weren’t totally Christianized, many of them were still pagans. Some of the rulers were trying to give themselves a more impressive lineage them they were entitled to as most of their ancestors were basically marauders that just got lucky. One house seemed to have been decedent from a Swede who may have been an offshoot of a royal Swedish house. It was the era of the Sutton Hoo Treasures, some Swedish scholars, in fact, claim that some of the armor contained there was made in Sweden. There was a verity of influences in Briton at the time, from different parts of Europe, as can be seen from items that have been discovered in Treasure Troves and burials.

    Now you mention an Anglo Saxon broach that contains a Hooked X. I have to ask where it was found. Was it found in a Treasure Trove, or a burial, or just in a trash pile? Can it be connected to anyone? Is it on display anywhere? Is there a picture of it available? Can you describe it if a picture isn’t available? As I said, I’m intrigued with this and wonder why a 7th Century Anglo Saxon broach would contain a Hooked X to begin with unless there is a reason for it to be there.

    Irene

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Irene,

      I was mistaken; apparently it's a 6th century brooch. I've loaded a photograph of it for your review.

      Delete
  23. Interesting for sure. It all makes sense because I look at it from a broad point of view. Carryon my wayward son!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Twig,

      It makes sense to everyone except the scholars who should know better. Hard to see with blinders on thought...

      Delete
  24. I was a victim of a hooked Ex. First she got hooked on meth, but called them diet pills. Then she got hooked on cocaine and bled me dry financially, before I could get her out of my life. Hooked X's are dangerous things.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Mountain Lion,

    These Hooked X's will drain you intellectually, but at the same time enrich you with new knowledge. Just ask the academics. They're getting drained intellectually drying to dismiss them, but would be incredibly enriched if they would open their minds to a whole new book of enlightenment.

    ReplyDelete
  26. By the way Scott, there is nothing, but humor I can add to your discussion on Hooked X's until I have time to look up the 4th century inscription in Spain. However, the Knight's Templar still exists. A good friend of mine is a high ranking officer in its Jerusalem Lodge. He has just been named Chancellor of the USA campus of the University of Israel. The People of One Fire will be offering online credit courses in Native American history through this university. When he comes to visit the Atlanta area in a couple of weeks, he plans to tell me more about the current Templars.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I really like the new hooked x example you showed us, above, on the paper numbered 225. In this excellent example, the hook is clearly and precisely put there. There cannot be any shady hints that it was an accident, or to help control flow of ink, etc. But for me, the best thing about this Icelandic hooked x is that it apparently predates the Larsson Papers by a number of years, perhaps giving even more credence to the informed opinion that the hooked x, as "secret code" in a medieval setting, had been around for a while.

    I'm quite enthusiastic about some of these new (old) "Icelandic" hooked x's, which to me help prove the already strong case for the Kensington Rune Stone being totally authentic.

    Now, for the "academic-comedians" to catch up. Fringe is as fringe does. NW Europe's rune experts need to get off the fringe on this one, and zero-in on America's medieval hooked x's...and see how they relate to historic Scandinavian ones.

    This is one way Europeans such as Dr. Williams can begin to appreciate the KRS for what it is, instead of attempting to re-bury it out of "academic prudence" of some kind.

    Well, it looks like the prudes have lost on the hooked x being found in numbers in both NW European and American historic settings that overlap and interrelate.

    Good job!

    Peyton

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peyton,

      There are many more good examples of Hooked X's and the "X" symbol for "a" in the manuscripts, but it doesn't matter if there were a million perfect examples, Williams has already decided the Hooked X is modern and nothing is going to change his mind.

      What's mind-boggling is he claims he is a "scientist" yet he actions prove the opposite. He believes that if found to be wrong it will ruin his reputation. A true scientist knows that it's not about "being right", it's about getting the right answer. All the while knowing that new evidence may come along that changes long held theories and ideas.

      I have seen this in my own career a couple of times where I had to change a written conclusion because new evidence proved my initial conclusion was wrong. I wasn't upset or worried in the least about reputation. I was relieved and happy to have reached the proper conclusion, and so was my client.

      Unfortunately, unless the professor has a profound change in his current thinking, which I highly doubt will happen, I'm afraid we're in for more of the same from the Scandinavian "scholars."

      Delete
    2. Right, it looks like poor Henrik may be willing to overlook all other categories of inquiry related to the KRS in favor of one category, runic study, in an overreaching attempt to debunk the KRS. In his mind, he must overlook anything realistic connected with the KRS in his one shot of runic study, leaving no room for other equally important considerations. I am left to believe that he has become overly confident and will surely end up with egg on his face. Some would-be "academic debunkers" are slowly becoming fringe thinkers, it seems.

      Peyton

      Delete

  28. MADAGASCAR

    RE: Show where Cap't Kid's siliver bar was found on the Adven. Galley. Was that show a reenactment of the original show where the military and high gov't officals took the silver bar before it was even dry?



    RE: Why mention of Bill Murray movle.

    The movie is a spoof about a underwater sea cap't that is on the hunt for a mega- shark that attacked and ate his parents where much of the action sceens are staged/corigraphed to sensationalize it for affect/effect. I think it was well done and the acting is so overdone that it makes for a rather great film if you like that kind of dry humor.

    Comment: People should really get off of your case about credentials, etc because the shows clearly have disclaimers at the begining and end of each show. ALL REALITY SHOWS ARE FOR ENTERTAINMENT and to enlighten viewers enough to form there own opinions. Dramatizations and facts that will engage the viewers mind and to think. I feel those that nit-pick at details fail to see the big picture and may have problems with developing an original thought or idea of there own. (my self included at times).

    It boils down to: if you don't like or understand the message, attack the messenger and the message itself. You and your people work very hard and a lot of money is spent to put your shows together for the viewers. ...and for the most part, you and your people do it well. Don't let them get to you. I bet there is not one of them that dose not wish they had your job!

    My best to you and yours.


    ReplyDelete
  29. Scott

    forgive me if I am off-topic here, but I watched HIST chan. "The Curse of Oak Island" show title: "Carved in Stone" first aired 12/15/2015.

    Rick and Marty inspected a number of flat rocks with a specialist and the first letter they showed was what was refferred to as an X, but it clearly looked like a hooked X to me.

    I don't pretend to know anything, but if you missed it...

    note: The specialist felt that the mystery of Oak Is. orginates from the Aztec Empire hidding treasures and minning for the Blue Clay that is found on Oak Island (50 feet +/- deep).

    Can't imagine you have the time, but it might be worth an hour of it, if you can find it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      I did see that carving and it does look like a Hooked X. Hard for me to say much about it without looking at it in person. I'm hoping to get that chance in the coming year.

      Delete
  30. Scott,

    The other thing that might fit with Knights Templer or the Aztec Empire is the massive amounts of coconut fiber that was used on Oak Island in flood tunnels, coconut is not found any where near Oak Island. And if I recall correctly, even the Oak trees where not originally indigenous to the Island itself.

    Don't know if any of this is relevant or even worth posting, but just a couple of things I found interesting.

    Thanks, and I hope I am not wasting your time.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Anonymous,

    I don't buy the Aztec's ever being on Oak Island and neither does anybody else. The Templars's were there and may have left the coconut fibers. What I don't understand is why haven't they performed C-14 dating on those fibers to see what era they came from?

    Seems simple enough to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Scott,

      C-14 dating has been done on some coconut fibers found in Smith Cove. The results of a 1993 test showed a preliminary date range from 1036-1298 with a mean of 1229, adjusted final report gave range 1168-1374 with mean of 1278. Info found here: http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk/research-documents/discoveries/coconut-fibre/

      In season 1 episode 2 "The Mystery of Smith Cove" the show apparently had C-14 dating done on another sample of coconut fiber they pulled from Smith Cove themselves with results dating 1260-1400.

      It is noted in the "Letter to Oak Island Investors detailing C-14 carbon dating results" of October 6, 1993 that "Finally, C-14 dates as modern as 300+ years are highly suspect from a scientific standpoint and are only to be used as confirmatory data and not the only source of dating."

      And the question is still open as to whether these coconut fibers were purposely brought there by someone during the above date ranges or a more recent time in the past, or if they were deposited naturally via ocean currents or storms.

      Delete
    2. Oops! I'm sorry, I neglected to sign my post RE: C-14 dating of the coconut fibers.

      Mike Morgan

      Delete
    3. Scott,
      They did submit coconut fibers dug up from Oak Island for C-14 dating. The dating proved this fibers were from around the 13th or 14th century AD if my memory serves me correctly. Very fascinating stuff going on around that tiny insignificant island!

      Delete
  32. I understand that the Oak Island TV show alluded to me and the Mayas, but no one asked me about the subject. The possibility of "Aztecs" being in that part of the world is zero. The Aztecs were landlubbers, who were afraid of the ocean.

    It is much more likely that Arawaks or hybrid Arawak-Chontal Maya traders were there - called Tamakoa. There was a mound building culture in the Shenandoah Valley which used Caribbean style metates and cassava grills. While living in the Shenandoah Valley I ran into several during excavations of foundations and septic tank fields. There were something like 134 branches of the Mayas, many speaking mutually intelligible languages. Only one of them - during the Post Classic Period called themselves a word similar to Maya.

    ReplyDelete
  33. 1. The posibility of mining for blue clay.

    2. Oak Isand would be a good place for the Aztecs to hide treasure. If they went as far as Georgia to obtain blue clay, why not Oak Island?

    3. It makes more sense (to me) that the Aztecs would pick up coconut fiber on their way around Florida, than for Knights Templer to travel so far south for the coconut fiber. I thought they said the fiber was dated?

    4. How do you know carbon dating was not done on the coconut fiber? I thouht it was dated. ( I could be wrong).



    5. You said: "I don't buy the Aztec's ever being on Oak Island and neither does anybody else."

    How can you say not to buy what "everyone" says as an argument in one line, then use "everyone" does not say to buy something else?

    RE: carbon dating?
    You said it was not done? Did you figure out a way to prove a negative? Wow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      1. Why travel all the way to Oak Island when there are much larger and easier sources for palygorskite?

      2. It is not a good place for Aztecs to hide treasure in my opinion.

      3. Not buying that at all.

      4. Apparently, I was wrong and there was C-14 dating done on the coconut fiber. I'd like to see the test data before I accept it.

      5. If you want to "buy it" that's your business, I don't and doubt too many other people do either.

      Sorry to disappoint you, but I think it's a silly theory. I'm also entitled to my opinion am I not?

      Delete
  34. Anonymous said...
    You said: "I don't buy the Aztec's ever being on Oak Island and neither does anybody else."

    There was at least one that felt that the Aztecs where not only at Oak Island, but they where responsible for construction of 10-X and even marked the spot where the treasure should be buried. And this person was expert brouht in by Rick and Marty. He put is reputation on the line in front of millions, and without a dog in the fight either way.

    It appears to me that you think the scientific method is for everyone else, but yourself. You decide what the truth is and then make or
    make-up the facts to support your truth, and discount/disregard any and all other facts that don't support your preconceived truth.

    Is that ... "simple enough for" you?

    (What did I say to you for you add such an unprofessional remark to end of your reply to me? I have tried to have a civil exchange with you and out of nowhere BANG!)

    I will still watch and enjoy your programs, and will even try to continue to learn from what you present. But, from now on it will be with a tad bit of skepticism.

    First collect the data and facts. Then analyze them to find truth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      There is no evidence for the Mayans being on Oak Island. It's someone's fantasy and it's nothing personal, but I just don't buy any of it as I've seen no evidence to give any credibility.

      Sorry.

      Delete
  35. Scott,
    I do not know if you are aware of a rare breed of horse called The American Curly Horse (sometimes called the American Baskir Curly Horse). This breed of horse was kept by certain tribes of the Sioux Nation for an unknown length of time. The tribes that these horses were associated with have oral histories passed down the generations for centuries.
    What makes these horses so unique is that they are said to predate the French and English incursions as well as the Spanish! The natives had no knowledge of horses or their domestication prior to European settlement. They didn't even have a word for "horse" in their language, and so they called the curly horses "buffalo dogs" because the horses resembled buffalo in the spring when they shed their curly coats. The horses were hunted the same as buffalo prior to Europeans teaching the natives the practice of domesticating horses as beasts of burden.
    The mystique surrounding these horses is that there is no agreed upon explanation as to how these horses came to be in North America. The native tribes told stories of the horses coming in from the north (Canada) centuries before any recorded European contact. There were pockets of these horses reported to be roaming when early European fur traders first began showing up in what is now the north central parts of the U.S.
    Perhaps early Europeans were unaware that horses had not been native to North America since the end of the last ice age when nearly all of the large mammals went extinct. By the time academics came to understand that horses are not native to the Americas and that the herds of wild mustangs could be traced back to the Spanish Conquistadors, the Curly horses had mingled into those mustang herds and the knowledge of their unique existence on this continent had been mostly forgotten outside of a few tribes in the Sioux Nation. Early settlers often singled out and killed curly horses from the mustang herds believing the horses suffered from disease because of their curly coats.
    These horses still exist in small numbers in the U.S., thanks to the efforts of part of the Sioux Nation and a number of dedicated breeders. I shared this with you because there are several different theories of where these horses originated from and how they came to be in North America. They were originally named American Baskir Curly Horses because they were thought to have originated from the Russian Baskir Curly horses, those being the only known breed of horse to have a curly coat not resulting from a deadly thyroid disease. The theory was that they were brought to Alaska by Russian miners during the gold rush of the 1800s. That theory suggests an isolated herd of horses escaped, then made their way through Canada and into the northern US dispersing as their numbers grew. This theory dismisses the oral traditions of the Sioux tribes that had insisted the horses appeared on the northern plains centuries before the 1800s. The debate of the origins of the curly horses continues which is why there are two official registries for the American Curly Horse.

    So, is it possible these horses could have been introduced into North America by the people that carved the KRS? It is plausible in my inexpert opinion. But I do honestly believe that the American Curly Horse is an intriguing mystery that is just another piece of the pre-Columbian puzzle in North America.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was real interesting, as I have never heard of these American Curly Horses.

      I had thought of Shetland ponies possibly being taken along on some trips, like for portages. I believe there were ponies or small horses in medieval Greenland, besides Iceland, but I'm not sure.

      Why not also, then, in Vinland at times in its history? Maybe some of that far inland medieval Norse traveling around was aided by some four-footed friends--not much previously thought about.

      Peyton

      Delete
  36. This hooked x is very interesting. Did you see that on the Oak Island stones that it looked like a hooked x showed up? I'm amazed at the way they keep appearing if you look. I'm from a Masonic family and I do believe there is more to this story of the hooked x.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara,

      It's amazing what you can find if one takes the time to look. For over a century KRS "scholars" never bothered to look for the linguistic or runic features in their own back yard because they assumed they didn't exist because the erroneously "believed" it was a "fraud." The geology told me the inscription was old and therefore genuine, so I knew they all had to exist. I then went over to Sweden and promptly found all of them.

      The Hooked X has been more difficult, but we have now "broken the dam" and examples throughout two millennia are showing up with ever more frequency. I don't expect the relevant scholars to change their tune however. Their arrogance and hubris simply won't allow it.

      That's why we need to keep relying on scientific method to get the answers to these important questions.

      Delete
    2. Unfortunately once scholars make a statement they will very rarely evolve with the evidence. They put so much in that they think it's impossible to change. I find this thinking the downfall of our current places of higher education. How can we discover the truth if we are stuck in a theories that no longer stand.

      Delete
    3. Barbara,

      This attitude and behavior is the antithesis of science and yet, scholars like Williams call themselves scientists not even understanding what the word means.

      Delete
  37. Y'all need to read my new article in the People of One Fire on the evidence of the establishment of Irish and Norse colonies on the Atlantic Coast during the Early Medieval Period. Three different lines of evidence, no matter how improbable, collaborate each other. The URL is: http://peopleofonefire.com/medieval-irish-colonists-on-the-south-atlantic-coast.html

    ReplyDelete
  38. Scott, it is well documented that both the Templars and the Sephardic Jews took refuge in Scotland. I have just found online substantial statements that Richard de St. Clare, the conqueror of Dublin, Wexford, Waterford and Ossaraihe, was a crusader and a Templar. The St. Clair family traces their heritage back to the original kings of France and were mentioned in the movie, "The Da Vinci Code." In ll80, the date when so many Deer People left Ireland for the New World, was when de St. Clare brought in a Master for the new Templar Lodge in his new Irish barony. He had dispossessed the Deer People freeholders and given their lands to the Templars. The Anglo-Norman Templars in SE Ireland may be the folks, who crossed the Atlantic to North America.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mountain Lion,

      Do you a source(s) for this info; sure sounds interesting?

      Delete
  39. Just google St. Clair, Templar, Ireland - there are multiple articles, plus the same information is in Wikipedia. It is amazing how many discoveries our People of One Fire researchers have made just by drawing a line between two points. There is something really wrong with academia these days. Many academicians are stuck in the muck.

    One of the websites is run by your friend, who appeared on the last two shows of America Unearthed on the Templars. He is a St. Clair.

    ReplyDelete
  40. MountainLion,

    Should have known Steve would be involved. He's done some really great research and proved to himself that some of his ancestors were indeed members of the medieval Knights Templar order.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Attapulgite is not blue. It is grayish white. A bluish colored clay would have cobalt oxide in it. I serious doubt that the Chontal Mayas would have explored as far north as the Maritime Provinces. Some curious Tamakoa Arawaks from Virginia or the South Atlantic coast might have. The coconut fibers are more likely from Scandinavians who followed the coast line down into the Caribbean.

    ReplyDelete
  42. It should be noted, acknowledged, and considered that the Aztecs were far more advanced with hydro-engineering than anyone else that may have been in the area of Oak Island at the time period.

    The Azyecs would have been far more experienced and knowledgeable about the use of coconut fiber in construction of flood tunnels.

    The knights Templer were masters of above ground stone masionry, not underground hydro-engineerring of flood tunnels.

    Why can't you even consider it possible?

    You seem to be as closed minded as the academics that rag on your work.

    The only way I see the Knights Temler using the coconut fiber is if they happen to find it washed up on the shore, and then figured out by chance how useful it would be in the flood tunnels.

    Since the Gulf Stream currents make it some what likely for the coconut fiber to end up that far north (especially with a nor-easter helping push it on shore), it is possible and perhaps even likely for the fiber to be on Oak Island with out going south to get it.

    Keeping my mind open...

    Others should try it sometime, its not that hard.

    Keep the faith, Scott and keep your mind eyes a little more open. Maybe others would not attack you so much, if you could at least be a little more considerate of other peoples work and ideas.

    May you and yours have a plesent holiday.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      First, there is no evidence of flood tunnels on Oak Island; the water flowing into their holes are simply the water table. It's a glacial island comprised of sand, clay, gravel and boulders on the ocean.

      There is zero evidence of the Aztecs being on Oak Island. I would be happy to entertain the idea, but I've seen no reason at this point to do so.

      People attack me because they don't want to understand the evidence. I will consider any plausible idea, but there has to be something tangible to get me interested. It's a matter of evidence my friend, not faith.

      Delete
  43. One thing all should remember is that the Gulf Stream carried floating artifacts from the New World to Ireland. There is a museum of Native American artifacts in County Kerry, Ireland. Also, on several occasions, canoes containing dead Native Americans or Inuits have washed up on the beaches of western Ireland. The museum exhibits include coconuts. So the coconut fiber may have come from a coconut picked up at sea off of Nova Scotia. What I try to do is think of all the possibilities, rather than prove a pet theory. That's how I figured out that Scott built the Track Rock Terrace Complex as a move toward fame and fortune. (just kidding)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mountain Lion,

      Some fame maybe, but where's the fortune??

      As I said before, show me something tangible Aztecs were on Oak Island and I'll be happy to entertain it. I've said the same thing about aliens and Bigfoot; my mind is open, but show me something tangible that I can examine. So far, not so much...

      Not saying they don't exist, I just haven't seen anything to get me interested yet.

      Delete
    2. So that's how the coconut got to the British Isles that King Arthur found! So much more simple than trying to figure the air speed velocity of an unladen sparrow!

      Delete
  44. Hello Scott - hope your family had a Merry Xmas. I love watching your show and enjoy the theories and challenges to history you produce. The result of your work . . . my eleven year old daughter is getting in to archaeology and history. We both started metal detecting together and she loves to collect rocks as we go.

    So - the next time you're getting hammered by closed minded people, you can think of the positive influence you've had on my daughter and myself. Being in a position to provoke and inspire interest in history, is in itself a great reward.

    Happy new year Scott. Thanks for the great work you do.

    Craig

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Craig,

      I’m very happy to hear that your daughter is inspired to learn about history and archaeology. Both wonderful disciplines when they stick to the facts. Perhaps she will be a pioneer that makes some incredible new discovery? Tell her to follow her dreams and she’ll have a happy life.

      As far as getting hammered by critics; they are more like gnats buzzing around that annoy. They haven’t landed any punches yet because they have no facts to refute. Their barbs only inspire me and other researchers who are breaking new ground. I’m currently reading an excellent new book by Graham Hancock titled, “Magicians of the Gods.” He’s writing about several brave geologists who are working on ancient sites that are pushing the beginnings of the high culture of man back thousands of years earlier than previously thought much to the consternation of many archaeologists. What I love is this work is being driven by science and will change our understanding of human history in a profound way.

      There is much work to do and we need fresh, young, open minds in both history and archaeology, to pave the way for this new understanding. Perhaps your daughter will be one of them?

      Happy New year to you and yours!

      Delete
  45. Scott, I finally finished the computer model of the Fig Island National Historic Landmark near Charleston, SC last night. It dates to at least 2,200 BC and is absolutely amazing. Because all the structures consist of complex, intersecting curves, it was one of the few times that I have been forced to use integral calculus, since a freshman at Georgia Tech. LOL The first of two articles on the architecture of Fig Island - actually on Edisto Island - may be seen at www.PeopleOfOneFire.com.

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    1. MountainLion and Scott there is an old history book (1823) that might be of interest to both of you in your studies. “The Natural and Aboriginal History of Tennessee : Up to the First Settlements Therein by the White People, in the Year 1768” by John Haywood originally published in 1823 the year of his death is a wild and fascinating read.

      He documents the mounds and finds by early Scottish and English settlers of the southeastern United States. Might be a great resource to you and Scott. It documents structures and artifacts that support many of the theories of pre-Columbian travel to the North American and South America. A copy of the book can be purchased on Amazon and a free digital pdf copy is at archive.org. He documents everything from the physical features of the natives to Roman coins found near Fayetteville. There is even documentation of Hebraic customs of the Cherokee and Creek tribes and stone carving and painting traditions of european style.

      Neal S

      Delete
    2. That's very interesting. I will have to get a copy. Keep in mind that neither the Cherokees or the Creeks were originally a single ethnic group. Some bands of the Cherokees in NC were really old Sephardic Jewish settlers from the early 1600s, while the elite of Koweta definitely intermarried with Jewish traders in the late 1600s and early 1700s.

      Delete
  46. Scott, the fresh Icelandic rune material you showed here is intriguing. It's making me think again about just who the KRS party of men were representing when they left the stone on Rune Stone Hill. We know by the message that in about 1362, the men passed through Vinland, but they considered themselves to be Norwegians and Swedes--not from from Iceland or Greenland either, for instance, as far as we can make out.

    So, the Templars had been put down for about a half-century before the date inscribed on the KRS. However, according to your theory about the post-Templars depositing the KRS here in medieval America, there was influence from the former Templars in the form of Scottish connections...at least around 1400 or so.

    So, it looks like earlier activity in medieval America (1362) included Scandinavians who later had influence on Scottish elements, perhaps, bridging this time of space between newly put-down Templars (1307) and later Norwegians/Swedes leaving behind the KRS (1362), and the several US East Coast rune stones exhibiting hooked x's, believed to be from around 1400 or so.

    According to your theory if I have it right, the Newport Tower is likely dated to around the same time as the several East Coast rune stones with hooked x's on them, which connects them all together, especially since the tower was apparently built using a Scottish measurement, if I have it about right.

    Naturally, I'm now wondering about this transition from Scandinavian exploration in America, to include Scotland in the last stages before everyone disappeared for a while, until later Colonial times.

    The hooked x does seem to connect everything together nicely, from times of actual Knights Templar existence (considering the new Iceland runic material), to the time of the KRS, with its Scandinavian origination, and then on to the later Scottish connection with the Newport Tower (though some think it was Portugal-built, etc.). The hooked x hooks everything together in time and space.

    Stone holes seem to be frosting on this cake. As you know, medieval stone holes and medieval hooked x's are often found together in this same time and space. Runes (including hooked x's) and stone holes seem to go together nicely in your medieval post-Templar paradigm that includes both Europe and America. Iceland in Europe and the KRS in America are both good examples.

    Thank you for bringing us this new hooked x information.

    Peyton

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    1. Peyton,

      You have things pretty organized with the exception of a couple of points. First, all we know for sure about the KRS inscription is the author used Old Swedish as the language and of course medieval runes and secret symbols. Second, “Goths” refers to people from the Southern Baltic region which could include Swedes, Danes, Germans, Dutch, and even French. Further, the word “NorRmen” could mean “Norman”, not necessarily “Norwegians.”

      Keep in mind also the Templar’s were only in France and kind of in England. In Portugal they simply changed their name and didn’t miss a beat. I think the Portuguese did come to North America as well as the Scottish Templars, but in their eyes they were one and the same ideologically.

      The Hooked X is the key that ties this all together and reveals the origins of this story which dates back at least two millennia to a relatively small tomb in Jerusalem.

      Delete
  47. Thanks for the clarification.

    I've been trying to understand the relationship between the Knights Templar and the Catholic Church back when they were working together during the Crusades. If one considers the time period of about 1100 to 1300, this might be considered a period of time when these two entities willingly shared all important information, including secretive exploration and mapping information.

    Maybe after the break-up in the early 1300's, these two now-separate groups each on their own decided to return to America to act upon previously known geography and other information. A sort of race may have ensued, with the post-Templars (Scandinavians and Scotsmen) attempting to reach beyond Vinland into the heartland, to possibly claim or re-claim something? What? Land, something else, or both?

    One might say that the Catholic Church, being represented by French missionaries accompanying fur traders, came late, not until the 1600's.

    It seems to me as though both the Catholic Church and the post-Knights Templars may have both been looking for something deep within America's hinterland. I'm wondering if this former team may each have tried to out-pace the other in claiming or reclaiming something--probably land, but maybe something else, too.

    I have read that in medieval times, treasure represented power. In that vein, I can't help wondering if attempts were made to reenter the Minnesota/Dakota region between about 1350 and 1400 in order to retrieve something related to much earlier exploration and surveying, back when the two groups were joined at the hip, back during the period of the Crusades.

    Any thoughts about this will be appreciated.

    Peyton

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  48. Happy New Year! I saw this in a "debunker's" blog:

    "...the trend has been to replace aliens and Atlantis with shows based on treasure hunting."

    Scott, an acquaintance of mine in MN is *carefully* claiming that he has discovered an actual medieval Norse code-stone, which shows in miniature an arrangement of stone hole rocks on a nearby ridge. He claims that a regular metal detector will not hit on a particular spot indicated by the code-stone, but a ferrous-only detector will get a strong hit, indicating that something made of iron/steel is buried quite deeply. He says the site is in a geographically significant spot, across from where a river empties into another one.

    He thinks whatever is buried at the remote site has to do with medieval exploration and possible land-claiming, probably well before the KRS was carved and deposited in 1362. Unfortunately, he cannot seem to get authorities/professionals interested in conducting even a cursory dig. (I heard MN may get a new State Archaeologist this year, so maybe that will help.) It could be that whatever is buried within that arrangement of stone holes is treasure of some kind, even if *only* history-treasure, meaning, possibly discovering an artifact or artifacts that would turn American history as most people think of it on its head.

    It seems to me that it might be okay to think about the possibility of treasure being buried here in MN as a way for a powerful medieval entity to claim land. In this case, the claim would be close to the MN/SD border, where beginning ocean waterway sources converge, and where many other stone holes and even some Norse petroglyphs can be found, as you well know from including them in your Hooked X book. My friend claims that you got him started on his research through this book, otherwise he would not have recently discovered the old Norse code-stone showing where something from the far past is buried on State land.

    But, ultimately, permission will need to come from the new State Archaeologist to conduct a professional dig. Maybe someone can squeeze the situation. Who, I wonder?

    For now, our American history here in MN, and the ground containing it, are frozen.

    Peyton

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    1. Peyton,

      In this case the debunker appears to be correct and my show was definitely guilty of falling into the ‘Treasure Hunting’ genre in our third season. I’m all for a good treasure hunt if it’s plausible and done properly.

      With regard to your friend’s discovery, I’d be very interested in seeing pictures of what he believes to be a “medieval Norse code-stone.” That would be the first place to start, before digging in the ground. You are correct the current State Archaeologist, Scott Anfinson, who continued the long tradition of close-minded State Archaeologists, so I expect that unfortunate tradition to continue. Of course, I’d love to be proven wrong about this, but I’ll wait to judge until I see what this person says and does.

      If your friend would care to share photographs of the code-stone that’d be great way to get the ball rolling with the guy I think you’re talking about.

      On a separate note, I will soon be posting a very pointed and controversial blog that deals with deliberate unethical behavior, on two fronts, related to the Kensington Rune Stone that demands corrective action and accountability on the part of the perpetrators.

      Delete
  49. Scott and commentators, what is a Norse code stone? I have never heard of such a thing. Unlike most folks, who dis your research, I have actually lived and worked in Scandinavia and have life long friends from the experience. Long before I knew that I was going to be on your show, I believed your interpretation of the Kensington Stone 100%.

    By the way, you blew it Scott. You should have made the first show treasure hunting instead of intelligent. Turns out that we found semi-precious stones embedded in the large boulders above acropolis at Track Rock. The late 16th century Spanish traders wrote down that they came to Great Copal (Track Rock) to buy gems and gold. There was a gem mining operation in the gap until the 1960s. Gold was mined nearby until the 1950s. LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MountainLion,

      I'm not sure what a Norse code is either other than Peyton or his friend's way of describing what he thinks he sees. In any case, if he is able to provide photos of this code it's be a great way to get things started.

      My bad, we'll do better next time and go looking for gems instead of historical truths...

      Delete
  50. So, the definition of a code-stone would fit into a pattern of playful codes being utilized by the Norse back in medieval times. I believe Dr. Williams has worked with or is aware of this notion of using codes and playful devices for learning, etc. My point is that the Norse enjoyed using codes.

    In the above case, it appears that the Norse used a playful method of letting a future devotee of stone holes know about what was left behind by others, in the form of a code written in stone holes, rather than in runes. My friend says that he not only discovered this stone showing in miniature actual stone hole rocks on a nearby ridge (25 paces), but that the message was fairly easy to de-code, and it seems to indicate that something is buried deeply in an exact spot, and that this has already been proven-out by metal detectors.

    I have been in contact with him and he said photos have just been sent to you, with explanation....

    Peyton

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    1. Just curious, why all the mystery surrounding your "friend's" identity? Bob Voyles, aka Gunn, has commented here on Scott's blog many times in the past, why is an intervening third party needed now?

      Delete
    2. Scott,

      In "Akhenaten to the Founding Fathers” page 221- you mention that Aug 2010 you have read the “C” Documents. The document mentions a first hand narration written in Latin by one of the first Templar Knights to Jerusalem’s Temple Mount. It describes what the Templar's found by excavating under Temple Mount.

      When are you going to Publish what are in the documents? Would’t those documents be as important or more important as the documents found in Iceland?

      p@

      Delete
    3. Pasedena,

      The C-Document information is very extensive and belongs to another researcher who allowed me to publish some of the Hooked X elements of the story. That researcher has been working for the past seven years to vet the story and write a book about it. I thought the book would be completed by now, but what I hear is that it's very close to being done.

      If true, it would be explosive new evidence. We'll see!

      Delete
    4. Peyton,

      I responded to Robert and would be interested in seeing any new stones holes I haven't looked at and hope to do that when the weather improves.

      With regard to Professor Williams understanding modern or ancient codes, I can assure he hasn't a clue. He has gone on record offering the irresponsible opinion the coded runic alphabets in the Larsson Papers do not predate circa 1900. He insists on making such a silly statement despite the voluminous evidence now coming out of Iceland that directly refutes his beliefs.

      And he has the audacity to call himself a scientist... Ugh!

      Delete
  51. Anonymous, I can only suppose that an intervening third party might be desirable in a well-placed mystery that is evolving. You are right about Gunn being mysterious. "Mysterious is as mysterious does," I guess. Most people love a good mystery.

    However, the deepest core of this medieval stone hole mystery seems to be concerned with what is possibly buried where the Norse code-stone indicates, as backed up by metal detectors. It seems as though Scott has been invited to consider actual photographic evidence of what Gunn is offering up for initial, careful public consumption: a nice mystery involving medieval Europeans roaming around this MN/SD region hundreds of years before Columbus even thought of getting in his first boat.

    In essence, I think my sometimes rascally friend, Gunn, is attempting to adorn Scott's blog here with a very real and well-placed mystery, yet to be acted upon by authorities.

    Personally, I don't see how Scott might advance the situation, but apparently Gunn thinks Scott will be able to see the credibility of the very recently discovered Norse code-stone, as it fits in with Scott's previous local findings of the likelihood of there being a huge Templar land claim.

    Anyway, thank you Anonymous, for advancing this Norse code-stone mystery here in MN by your illumination, above, as the mystery over the MN Norse code-stone steadily and purposefully evolves.

    I can't wait to see what Scott thinks!

    Peyton

    ReplyDelete
  52. Scott
    Thank you for all your work.
    Templars are a subject dear to me since reading HBHG in the late 80's and a trail that definitely leads to North America. Been a long time since new data has been added to the mix to pick up their trail. Can't wait till tomorrows new series to see where you go with it. Templar money & ships would appear to be behind the rise in merchant ships to the New World as well as the those flying the jolly roger.
    So again, thank you for all your work.
    Thank you for your patience with those who debunk not to find the truth but to suppress the truth.
    Thank you for bringing attention to and helping to preserve artifacts that belong to the people.
    There is an incredible story to be told.
    Kathy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kathy,

      There is a lot more to be told about this incredible story. Stay tuned and thank you sincerely for all your support.

      Delete
  53. Scott,

    Mark Pinkham has just published an article in Ancient Origins, which theorizes that the original Knights Templar were descendants of Jewish and Christian Jewish refugees, who fled Judea in 79 AD. They settled in Languedoc & Province (southern France. Here is the URL:

    http://www.ancient-origins.net/history/origin-knights-templar-descendants-jewish-elders-005078?utm_source=Ancient-Origins+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7cfbd8a448-Top_Trending_Stories_Jan_No1_REAL_04_01_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2dcd13de15-7cfbd8a448-93263321

    The theory would seem to be quite speculative, except that last year, while doing research into the 17th century Sephardic Jews of Appalachia, I was shocked to discover that my French Huguenot (Protestant) ancestors in Lyon, France were originally Jewish refugees from Spain. As you probably know, the symbol of the Reformed Church of France (Huguenots)is the Cross of Languedoc, also known as the Templar Cross.

    What are your thoughts on Pinkham's theories?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mountain Lion,

      This is the same thesis I’ve been talking about for years. It’s not at all speculative and there is a ton of factual evidence to support it. These Icelandic documents are one small part of that evidence.

      We’ve only scratched the surface of this story we’re hoping to develop it further down the road.

      Delete
    2. came across this book today as I was digging through Amazon....http://www.amazon.com/key-John-Philip-Cohane/dp/0805205276/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= of course I've ordered it :)

      Delete
    3. Dave,

      I've seen this book and am aware of the idea of well traveled ancient lost cultures. I'm currently reading Graham Hancock's new book that convincingly explores what catastrophic event likely caused this early high culture to almost go extinct.

      This is fascinating subject matter that connects with many current hotly debated archaeological topics like Solutrean verses Clovis, etc.

      Delete
    4. Oh good. Hope the Huguenots connection will be addressed. Haven't read Pinkham's theory. On the to-do list. I think they were a product of Templar ideas. Their expulsion from France was probably one of the first brain drains from a country. England benefitted from it. At the same time that they were being expelled from La Rochelle they were being expelled from New France in a double whammy. Some of those same Huguenots won the war for Britain in Canada. Needless to say I have a totally different opinion of what was happening north of the 49th than what I was taught in school.
      Kathy

      Delete
  54. here's an additional website of which I'm a member. They get real down and dirty with the comet stuff. In otherwords, they have nailed the comet and the clovis barrier. they also don't put up any of the stuff you had to deal with. they have no problem dismissing anybody who strays of topic. In short, bring your science. I would think you would be more then welcome person. their members are a list of who's who in this circle.

    http://cosmictusk.com/

    ReplyDelete
  55. here's some work that being discussed on the above website. It is published by none other then "Napier and gang"....

    http://cosmictusk.com/william_napier-asher-bailey-steel-comet-centaur/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dave,

      This is great stuff even if a little off-topic on this thread. I'll dive into this a little deeper once I'm done with Hancock's book that I'm thoroughly enjoying.

      Delete
  56. Scott, you said:
    "First, there is no evidence of flood tunnels on Oak Island; the water flowing into their holes are simply the water table. It's a glacial island comprised of sand, clay, gravel and boulders on the ocean.." (dec 25 - here)

    If the water flooding into multi-level well (aka 10-X) today is glacial fresh water, the same water would have been there 800 (+/-) years ago. (as I think the last ice age was over 10,000 years ago). How were the multi levels/platforms every ten feet, and for that matter 10-X itself get costructed 800 (+/-) yeasrs ago without the problems of flooding? Why did 10-X not flood until it was re-dug, I think in 1800s? Further, the water is salt & fresh mix.

    Then you said:
    "People attack me because they don't want to understand the evidence. I will consider any plausible idea, but there has to be something tangible to get me interested. It's a matter of evidence my friend, not faith." (same post)

    It would appear to me that you have become extremely defensive and darn right condsending towards anyone that does not accept everything you say as absolue. Maybe you are just a little jealous because
    Rick L. & Marty L. have not invited you to play on Oak Island?

    There is plenty of evidence and out right facts that point to a food system of some kind. Most of them point to tunnels. Why is this so hard for you to except? Is it because it was not YOUR theory?

    Things that make one say "hummmm?"

    I still find you and your work/ideas/theories thought provoking and extremely interesting. It is too bad that your ego may get future historical facts that you submit rejected because of how you respond to others now.

    But that is what will always give them one up on what ever you submit. But, stranger things have happened. I hear they used to think the Earth was flat and the center of the solar system. Heck, I remember when Pluto was a planet!

    What is my point?

    There is not one; just food for thought.




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    1. Anonymous,

      The water table on the island would be a brine solution as salt water moves through the glacial sediments and mixes with fresh meteoric water. I saw no evidence of platforms every ten feet during my two trips to the island and until I do I consider it one of the many Oak Island myths that have become accepted as fact.

      Jealous? Hardly, I was contacted by the production company for the show last year and was unable to appear because I was making the Pirate Show. Rick and Marty have nothing to do with who is and isn’t on the show, the production company and the network decide.

      As far as theories go; which of the dozen or so theories are you talking about that have been forwarded? For that matter, you have no idea what I think as I have yet to say what my thoughts are. Out of respect for the show and the network, I’m keeping my mouth shut until the show has run its course. You seem to be enjoying it so don’t let me stop you.

      As a geologist I am simply talking about the realities, and fallacies, regarding the geological aspects of the island. Ego has nothing to do with it. I have nothing against the brothers who seem like genuinely good guys and I wish them luck. However, based on what I’ve seen so far it appears they may have run out of it.

      Delete
    2. Ah, common ground. The notion of "flood tunnels" on Oak Island to guard some sort of treasure have been disproven by every geological survey ever done there, dating back to the 1860's. The only thing getting buried on that island are the geological reports. Even ruling out such findings, and the reality of the Windsor Formation beneath responsible for the naturally occurring caverns and water flow, consider the idea of these alleged flood tunnels themselves. Wooden tunnels built over two hundred years ago, channeling in seawater hundreds of yards from the ocean to a depth of over ninety feet. If only metal drains and plumbing beneath our cities could last half as long, with fresh water flowing through them to boot. On its face the flood tunnel claim is wholly ridiculous.

      As for other "facts" embraced by the TV show, wooden platforms every ten feet? The legend began with young boys finding a tackle block hanging over soft earth after seeing lights on the island of some sort. Well, if you're going to bury the world's greatest treasure, do you think you ought to leave a tackle block hanging over it? Or was it a cut tree limb. I get mixed up with all the variations of what is actually a very common (for its time) generic treasure tale. So anyway, these boys... well, the named ones were actually adults at the alleged date of 1795 if you want to go and search real records... they dig and find wooden planks, and give up after ten feet or so. Then the myth changes over the years. It goes from finding planks and digging down ten feet, to finding pick marks every ten feet. Then it morphs into finding wooden platforms every ten feet. Then the clincher, at 90 feet there's a stone with coded markings reading something like forty feet down two million pounds are buried.

      Now for more spoilers. There is no written record of even the notion of treasure at Oak Island, in any diary, book or news report until a treasure license was sought in 1849. Does that year ring a bell? Gold fever anyone? The 90' stone was allegedly found in the early 1800's and disappeared early in the 1900's. In that entire time no one photographed it. No one traced it. The markings never appeared in writing. In fact, it wasn't until 1949, in a book meant to sensationalize Oak Island, that the coded symbols actually showed up. Skeptical yet?

      Links of a gold chain? Where? What happened to it? Like bits and pieces dangled to entice investors and treasure seekers? Of which there are many of course. And the Spanish coin which was discovered in the swamp during season one of The Curse of Oak Island? You can find one yourself just like it for ten bucks on Ebay. It is a find wholly lacking in archaeological context and even if left on Oak Island centuries ago, it's akin to finding someone's long lost penny jar rather than a treasure for the ages. Doesn't anyone still convinced there's treasure on Oak Island worry that there's absolutely no evidence for it that includes actual treasure? There's not even an established historical basis for anything to even be there. Just the tackle block. Suspicious yet?

      Even the seven must die legend appears wholly concocted. It used to be when the last oak tree disappeared from the island, the treasure would be found. Apparently, that wasn't sexy enough for the producers of the current television show, so they counted the bodies and left room for more intrigue.

      Who hasn't jumped on board? From the Templar fans, to the Francis Bacon/Shakespeare conspiracy buffs, to King Solomon's Treasure seekers, and don't forget Captain Kidd of course. What's next? Well, considering the producers, Prometheus Entertainment, are the same ones pumping out Ancient Aliens, could an extraterrestrial angle be next? Stay tuned!

      For a thorough and thought provoking analysis of the hoax that is Treasure on Oak Island, see Richard Joltes' website criticalenquiry.org. I must credit him with the facts above.

      Delete
    3. Joe,

      I don't have much to add and I can't believe I'm saying this, but I have to agree with you...

      Did I really say that?

      Delete
    4. WOW! I almost fell out of my chair! Not even in my wildest fantasies did I see this coming. I now have renewed hope for Republicans and Democrats, Israelies and Arabs, straights and the LGBT community, and the various races and ethnic groups finding something they can agree upon also.

      Congratulations Joe and Scott.

      PS: You both also share skepticism concerning the "Roman Sword".

      Delete
    5. Anonymous,

      Don't start celebrating any love-fest yet. The current Oak Island situation isn't a difficult puzzle, so our being on the same page here is expected. I'll start to raising an eyebrow when Joe and other debunkers start discussing things like true scientists and not like the disingenuous self-serving, close-minded academics.

      As an example, I saw a conversation on the KRS Wiki page where the "No Pre-Columbian anything" guard dog editor, Doug Weller, is refusing to post my "Compelling New Evidence" book as suggested by two people, in the literature section. His argument is my geological work was not peer reviewed when it absolutely was. Joe has furthered the same arguments which are simply false and he refuses to accept this fact. Until he and other debunkers start acknowledging facts I cannot take them seriously and he cannot play in my sandbox.

      Delete
    6. I watch the Oak Island show, and I enjoy it.....even though nothing will ever be found there. However, there is one aspect of the show that really turns my stomach every time it comes up....

      The "Seven Must Die" legend. There is no historical legitimacy to this legend as Joe Scales points out above, but the the production company keeps harping on it. And, after every time it's mentioned the cameras close in on Dan Blankenship. It's almost like the producers of the show are just waiting for this poor guy to die of natural causes so they can use the death to wrap up the show some how. It makes me really uncomfortable. I don't blame the Lagina's for this. They seem like really nice guys, but that production company seems like real a school of sharks.

      Delete
    7. Anonymous,

      Welcome to the world of TV. I can tell you that in that situation I would never allow that to happen and I do think the Lagina Brothers has some culpability. On the other hand, they may not realize until the shows air what the production company did. I don't know what the arrangements are so until we do we have to give the brothers the benefit of the doubt.

      Delete
    8. "... disingenuous self-serving, close-minded academics."

      Name calling again? Why not celebrate the New Year and remain on common ground; and bash Oak Island some more?

      I didn't have room on my last post to talk about "borehole 10X". Did you know that site for drilling at 10X was determined by Dan Blankenship via dowsing? Yeah... two sticks magically waving in the wind. Dowsing. Woods Hole ruled out anything going on down there years ago. This television show however, and others eager to cash in online jumping on its coattails, want you to believe they've somehow stumbled upon relics from an ancient civilization. By dowsing, mind you. It seems the show itself forgot a camera down there dispelled any notion of manmade pillars or construction on an episode only a couple weeks ago, as a rare trained expert (for this show) told them they were wasting their time with 10X. Yet, by this week's episode, it looks like they're on their third... or is it fourth now... diver to head on down that rabbit hole. The insanity of that is plain and clear, as well as the futility, and thankfully no one got killed trying to do it, as we would have heard news of that by now.

      Another comical aspect of the show is how they'll find a piece of wood and act as if that's significant somehow. Or remember the first season when they claimed they bored into the corner of a treasure chest? As if that wasn't abandoned wooden cribbing which was prevalent in all the digging done there over the years. Again, the evidence for treasure never includes actual treasure... just the edge of treasure apparently. Like that story about how when a hundred and fifty years ago or so, when that one group struck a treasure chest, and then decided they were done for the day. How did that legend go? Was it because it was Sunday and they were late for church, or was it because it was dark and they'd get the treasure in the morning? Then of course the next day, those darned flood tunnels went to work and dashed their dreams. Yeah. Like that's human nature. You strike the treasure chest and decide to come back later. Please.

      Though Rick Lagina may still be fooled by that inaccurate and misleading Readers Digest article from the 1960's, his brother Marty is an engineer, an attorney and a millionaire. There is no way Marty didn't do his homework in this regard to realize the true nature of this hoax from the very beginning. Robert Dunfield's critical geological report from the 1960's, which had been initially hidden from the public, was certainly available prior to the Michigan group buying in, which like any other scientific study on the island ruled out any possibility of manmade flood tunnels. Yet there is the television show, critical of Dunfield's work as "destructive" to the island's environment, continuing to assert the flood tunnels are protecting the "treasure".

      As ratings continue to be high on the relative cable channel scale, this show is likely to continue unless of course the Laginas realize their reputations are going to take a hit as it all plays out with the likes of Prometheus Entertainment and their cavalcade of speculative fantasizers they put on parade week after week. But when this show does end, either by the decline of ratings due to absolutely no finding of treasure of any kind or the Laginas realizing the hit to their reputations, they will all pat themselves on the back for a job well done. But alas... it was The Curse that beat them. Then they'll open up a resort true to their actual corporate name; Oak Island Tours, Inc. See the angle now?

      Delete
    9. Joe,

      In fairness to you and other skeptics, my harsher than normal treatment is due to my current involvement in the outing a particularly unethical academic. I will share details very soon, so I apologize to those academics who are simply overly rigid and narrow as opposed to close-minded.

      Delete
    10. Can one be overly rigid? Not at my age, no doubt. Narrow on the other hand, I may have to take issue with.

      Scott... I can call you Scott, right? If I can be a friend here, I'd advise you to let your work stand on its merits. When confronted with criticism, address the criticism rather than malign its author. Getting into such public battles might play to a certain element, but its not an element that's ever going to give your work the respect you feel entitled to. Should you be the victim of an intentional tort, let a lawsuit do the outing for you. Otherwise, by singling someone out for public attack, you might end up getting one in return.

      Good luck to your Vikings this weekend. Gonna be a cold one.

      Delete
    11. Joe,

      You are welcome to call me Scott.

      This is not about criticism of my work; it's about a willful, unethical attempt to alter facts for personal gain, and myself and others will not allow this to happen.

      And let’s be clear, I've said many times that I welcome legitimate criticism of my work. What I won't tolerate is unfounded dogmatic attacks or dishonest argumentation without acceptance of documented facts. You've brought up some valid points and asked some legitimate questions in our exchanges. What you have not done is acknowledged the facts that answer, or refute your criticism. Hence, I determined our exchanges to be unproductive, but I'll change my attitude if you can change yours?

      If you are indeed an elder statesman, I would think you could appreciate these points. And if you truly are an open-minded, objective academic then you'd appreciate my concern about a scholar who recently wrote the following to a colleague of mine: “You do not answer my questions about what I would gain by denying the genuine authenticity of American runic inscriptions. If proven wrong, my professional reputation would be shattered.” In other words, because he has inappropriately and arrogantly rendered his opinion without factual basis, he’s boxed himself in using flawed logic and miss-understanding of scientific method. This miss-guided position is partly what led to the unethical behavior.

      I recently wrote the following in my last failed attempt to try and save him from himself. So now he will be called out for the unethical fool that he is: “In fact, we now a new trove of secret society ciphers in Iceland, many using runes and the Hooked X, that are shedding new light on this puzzle and the North American rune stones. As a scientist, shouldn’t you be taking an open-mined, neutral position and be receptive to these new possibilities? If your conclusion/opinion changes based on new, never-before-seen evidence, that doesn’t mean you were wrong or stupid. A true scientist is always open to new evidence that often demands that a previously held idea or theory needs to change. Changing your previous position doesn’t "destroy" your reputation, it enhances it. It’s called “science” and happens every day in the scientific world.”

      I took an oath that requires me to take action to right a wrong that has been committed if I am able. Old fashioned as they may sound, this issue is about accuracy, integrity, and truth; attributes that I think never go out of style. This is not a personal battle I’m going to finish, it is my duty.

      Go Vikes!!!

      Delete
    12. My, my! This post has been active the past few days! I'm having a devil of a time playing catchup reading all the posts!

      I wanted to reply here about TV productions such as the Oak Island show. I have a friend that tried to make an educational TV show for a different network several years ago. He's a good man that a lucrative business in his field of interest. We were all so excited for him and all his hard work when his show was about to premier!
      And then it premiered. To anyone that didn't know my friend, or the area of his expertise, the show was great entertainment. To potential clients for his business, the show might have seemed entertaining, but unprofessional. So it therefore deterred new business. My friend was shocked by how he and his business were portrayed and how his "educational program" had been turned into a heap of ignorant garbage.
      So he fired the production company, and told the network he would sue them for deformation of character if they ever aired the show again in the U.S. Unfortunately for him, the damage was already done. His business has suffered, as well as his reputation.

      Moral of the story is that there isn't much if any "reality" in Reality TV. Some production companies/networks have more integrity than others.
      That being said...I must admit that "The Curse of Oak Island" is certainly entertaining! But having witnessed/experienced the making of a TV show first hand, I watch more for entertainment purposes. If it catches my interest enough to learn more, then that is a bonus in my book! A super BIG BONUS! I love learning new things. But I do my fact checking in libraries and from first hand sources rather than TV shows. ;)

      That being said...I'm ready to see you back in action on TV, Scott! You keep me entertained and wanting to learn more! (Thumbs up!)

      Delete
    13. P.S. Say what you will about shows like "Ancient Aliens", but I love that show! I don't even have to agree with the majority of the views on the show (varied and contradictory as they may be) to love it. The reason why I love "Ancient Aliens" is because it makes me think. I get to see many various views and theories presented in an entertaining way with all the various bits of "evidences" put forth to support those theories. It grabs my interest which then drives me to delve into books and magazines to learn more about the places and their histories. And come on! Who doesn't just love Giorgio's wild hair!?
      It's too bad people can't be open minded about other people's views and be more willing to study other people's theories. You just never know when a differring theory might reveal something new and amazing that's been over looked before! If everyone thought the same and believed the same then this would be a very dull and boring world with no progress to ever speak of.

      Delete
    14. InvisibleJenn,

      I agree that both shows are entertaining to a lot of people and if they make you think all the better. My problem is I've been to Oak Island multiple times and have a pretty good idea of what the situation is there. Being a geologist from Minnesota I understand post-glacial terrain pretty well and that is important to understanding what did and is now going on there. Nobody watching these shows has to take an exam afterward so enjoy away!

      And as for Giorgio's hair? Meh...

      Delete
    15. Scott, you wrote:

      "If you are indeed an elder statesman, I would think you could appreciate these points. And if you truly are an open-minded, objective academic then you'd appreciate my concern about a scholar who recently wrote the following to a colleague of mine: “You do not answer my questions about what I would gain by denying the genuine authenticity of American runic inscriptions. If proven wrong, my professional reputation would be shattered.” In other words, because he has inappropriately and arrogantly rendered his opinion without factual basis, he’s boxed himself in using flawed logic and miss-understanding of scientific method. This miss-guided position is partly what led to the unethical behavior."

      I believe you are completely missing the point to this exchange. First, the quoted individual asks your colleague (for the second time, apparently) what he has to gain by denying the authenticity of American runes, as he was obvious challenged in that regard. He then points out that if he is proven wrong in denying their authenticity, his reputation will be ruined; which is rather obvious and innocuous. He is simply defending his position and letting it be known that he is not acting out of any other motive than his beliefs. This is nothing to be up in arms about.

      Oh, and you need a new kicker...

      Delete
    16. Joe,

      I’m sure you understand my comments are made in the context of not knowing who you are. It’s nothing personal. With regard to my comments about this particular unethical scholar there is a lot of information you don’t have that would add additional context. However, the basis he uses for his opinion is flawed and not defendable. My point is unless you have a defendable factual basis to support an opinion you must recuse yourself. This is not the way soft-science academia works and is why they consistently get things wrong.

      In this particular case, the negative opinion of the academic in question is based on fraudulent data that was unethically generated and intentionally misused. The reality is I’m the only person in a position to fully understand the details of the situation that demands more action than just raising my arms. I’ve already begun the process of alerting certain institutions that will also be taking appropriate action. You only know the tip of the iceberg of this story, but more will come out in due time.

      We played a perfect game for just over three quarters and gave the game away. We not only need a new kicker, but it’s time to let Adrian Peterson move on as well. He has a history of coughing the ball up at the worst possible times in the playoffs. That loss hurt…

      Delete
  57. Okay, this is possibly off topic, but I have a comment about "peer review." Scott, you will not believe how much crap I see in archaeological reports because of peer review. If one has a room full of ignoramuses functioning as the peer review group, what one gets is a whole lot of ignorance. What has happened in much of academia is that education has taken on a feudal structure. A few authority figures in each profession dominate the discussion and expend much of their energy blocking alternative points of view. You saw what happened down here. Archaeology professors, who had absolutely no qualifications in either Maya or Creek cultural history made sure that I would not be allowed to speak to the public, even though I had studied in Mexico and taught Mesoamerican architecture at Georgia Tech - not to mention that I had been a researcher for the Creek Nation for five years. For a geologist, you are not shabby at all.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Mountain Lion,

      I don't think the discussion of peer review is off topic at all. In fact, it goes to the heart of the matter with controversial subjects like the KRS, etc. I have been accused repeatedly of not having my geological work peer reviewed by academics. This is absolutely false. Further, the reality is there is no one in the world who is truly qualified to review my tombstone study which was the first of its kind research. The only academics with the geological background to evaluate the details of the KRS greywacke indigenous to Minnesota were my professors at the University of Minnesota who studied and mapped the Thomson Formation source rock.

      People like "Joe" frame the peer review argument by saying it has to be done in a scientific journal. Written peer review is proper whether published in a journal, a professional report, or in a book. My work stood up to their scrutiny and it is time people like "Joe" and non-scientific academics like Henrik Williams, respect and accept this work.

      Delete
  58. Trust of Rick & Marty?

    Rick is an attorney?

    Marty help develope the Fracking Process that he used to frack the heck out of MN & ND, yes? Fracking is now trashing the envitnment, all over the country, yes?

    I am pretty sure Rick said they would be willing to do everything legally possible to find something. I think this conflicts with putting the safety of the environment and others first.

    ...and the way they work disabled Dan and crack on him on almost every show. ...then they do a segment about how much they like and respect him?

    ...and how come they keep showing that clip where rigging snapped that looked like the divers bucket was hooked to, but, never finish showing what happenened, who was involved, why it broke, who was in the basket or the rest of the story.

    After the eye opening responses to my last post, I feel as though I still have some crow left to eat. Thanks for correcting me.

    With that said, I am still on the fence, and hope that Scott will keep his word to explain the rest of what he claims to know. On the other hand, I understand his need to be careful when there are so many powerful players involved.

    I was very happy to see the outstanding inputs from all sides that was kept mostly civil. I look forward to more from same and others.



    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous,

      I don't know anything about the Lagina Brother's business practices and I'm completely bored with talking about Oak Island. Since I'm currently under contract with History I can't talk about it anyway.

      There's a lot more interesting things to discuss here than that show.

      Delete

  59. RE: Scott Wolter / January 7, 2016 at 8:37AM

    "For that matter, you have no idea what I think as I have yet to say what my thoughts are. Out of respect for the show and the network, I’m keeping my mouth shut until the show has run its course."


    THINGS THAT MAKE ONE SAY huummm...?

    ...and you keep calling others liars about peer reviews, saying that all of your work has been properly reviewed and accepted as fact. Yet, I have not seen a singal reference such a person or even an institution where such a person might be employed. Not even one of your own books is mentioned as a source for authentication of YOUR facts.

    No wonder you don't want an open discussion about Oak Island.

    It seems lile people did want to disect it, and maybe they are getting tired of KRS and the hooked-X ?

    As an educator and scientist, didn't you say something about taking an oath? What oath might that be, anyway?





    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous,

      Either my work has been peer reviewed or it hasn’t, right? You apparently don’t believe me, but I don’t care what you think since I have no idea who you are. But I will give you one example of academic peer review; are you familiar with Alice Beck Kehoe’s book, “The Kensington Runestone: Approaching a Research Question Holistically”? She’s an academic and her book was essentially a review of all the work presented in my “Compelling New Evidence” book where she concluded that we had scientifically proven the KRS was authentic.

      As I’ve said before, I’ll be happy to share the written peer reviews, and my responses, to qualified individuals who identify themselves. I know it shouldn’t matter under normal circumstances, but the KRS is hardly a normal situation. So far, my work has been debated by unqualified on-line debunkers and skeptics with an agenda. If you think I’m going to allow that nonsense to continue with regard to my work you are mistaken.

      I’m not opposed to an open discussion about Oak Island, I just can’t participate in it right now.

      I can assure you people are more interested in the KRS and the Hooked X than ever before. They aren’t going anywhere and I suggest you get used to that fact.

      Every licensed professional takes an oath to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public and I can promise you every one of us takes that oath very seriously. I have also taken oaths as part of other organizations that agree it is my duty to perform certain actions against certain wrongdoings.

      Delete
    2. Kehoe is no geologist mate, and though you may have taken an oath as part and parcel to your professional/commercial work as a geologist, it's no license to venture beyond your field, nor is it certification that your work is beyond question. Not that I wish to go through this with you yet again, but the more clinkers you attempt to equivocate with peer review does you more harm than good I'm afraid.

      Cheers,

      Lesley

      Delete
    3. Lesley,

      The oaths I took include anything and everything I work on. True, they are no guarantee of competency or correctness. However, they do ensure as much as possible that my work will be conducted to the best of my ability and with high ethical standards. Most importantly, and where professional peer review diverges from academic peer review is accountability. Without that there are no repercussions to bad or sub-standard behavior and again, is in large part why we have the mess we currently have with the current academic who is intentionally publishing falsified, non-peer reviewed data on the KRS. It would be nice if one of you would acknowledge this important point.

      The work I've published outside of geology stands on its own merit. Point out the flaws the professors and professionals missed and I'll address them. Alice Kehoe is well aware of the academic peer review of my geological work and she was satisfied that the reviewers were satisfied.

      On the contrary, I would argue calling these points of fact 'clinker equivocations' reflects poorly on you my friend.

      Delete
    4. If I might interject here Scott, I seriously doubt that Professor Kehoe shares your views on peer review; whether in the general sense or the particular notion in regard to the above referenced book of hers discussing your work in chapter 4. In fact in that book, she notes in regard to your weathering studies comparing the KRS to the Maine tombstones (on page 37) that "This one comparative study is not sufficient to establish relative dating for the Runestone, as Wolter recognizes." Furthermore, in the more than ten years since she published said book, she has backtracked somewhat on her support for the authenticity of the KRS, hasn't she?

      She is quite an interesting woman and it must have been a pleasure getting to know her. Do you follow her on Twitter? She had this to say back in 2010:

      "HistoryChannel now FantasyChannel selling Templar-Grail nonsense & sensationalizing human sacrifice. Viewer beware! or ask akehoe@uwm.edu"

      https://twitter.com/AnthroDr/status/10206250285

      I was rooting for your Vikings in that game and that was certainly a punch to the gut. Makes for a long off season, unfortunately. At least you guys are back as contenders for your division.

      Delete
    5. Joe,

      I do recognize that more relative-age weathering work should be done. However, we now have two studies (Winchell and Wolter) that are consistent with the KRS inscription being centuries old. Based on logic, this establishes the authenticity of the artifact as the prevailing conclusion. Nothing tangible has come forward to refute either study so let's have a party.

      Alice has not back-tracked on her opinion about authenticity and if she had, I would know about it. What she has maintained from the beginning is she doesn’t believe the Templars had anything to do with it. If you watched our documentary, “Holy Grail in America”, you saw her say this almost a decade ago.

      As far as her opinion about History Channel, I agree some of the programs like "Bigfoot Captured" are silly, but some are quite good. I thought the recent special about the investigation into the two Alcatraz escapees who survived and lived until at least the mid-1970’s in Brazil was excellent.

      The sting of the loss will fade and soon we’ll be again drinking the purple Kool-Aid of optimism about going to the Super Bowl next year!

      Delete
    6. "Based on logic, this establishes the authenticity of the artifact as the prevailing conclusion. Nothing tangible has come forward to refute either study so let's have a party."

      Actually, based on logic, that would be the fallacy of argumentum ex silentio; which is an argument from silence. With all due respect of course.

      Delete
    7. Joe,

      Believe what you want; I stand behind what I said.

      Delete
  60. Okay . . . Scott, I have a question about islands that is much more directly connected with our mutual interest in travels back and forth between North America and NW Europe. My ERSI satellite imagery shows hundreds of islands just under the surface between Newfoundland and the Canary Islands. They would have composed a chain of islands that could easily been canoed. Do you know when these islands were covered by the ocean? Sea levels rose dramatically between 8000 BC and 3,000 BC, but some of these islands could have still be above water after then.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. MountainLion,

      If the chain of what are now seamounts is within the range of 3-400 feet below current sea level, then I think it's possible, and indeed likely, they would have been islands prior to roughly 10,000 years ago. Melting of the world's continental ice sheets since that time has raised sea level covering vast tracks of land along the continental margins and submerged an untold number of islands.

      Delete
  61. Scott,

    I don't know that much about the development of Runic writing, but unlike most of the people that are making comments, I have seen the real thing. It was at many shrines, where I worked in Sweden. There were many variations of Runic even within relatively small section of the Oresund region. The earliest Runic was far less similar to Roman lettering than the last monuments, which were erected during the Christian Era.

    Where I lived was also the center of Bronze Age Scandinavian civilization and the starting point for the Viking Age. There was a 9th century Viking port, Backviken, on the island where my project was. This makes me think that with such variations,it is impossible to make blanket statements about what is and isn't authentic Runic.

    However, what I don't understand is "Why are these people giving you so much caca on your Hooked X message board?" I certainly have not had that sort of treatment from my fellow architects. Those that were interested in the subject, agreed totally with my interpretation of the terrace complex architecture . . . and also my opinion of the nutcases, with absolutely no credentials on Mesoamerican or Muskogean culture , who still have the stupid comments posted on their websites, long after we proved that Mayas were coming to Georgia for many centuries to mine and perhaps obtain slaves.

    What I observed is they constantly were on the attack, presenting themselves as being experts on the subject . . . when in fact they didn't know diddlysquat. They think by being aggressive, people won't see through the charade. LOL

    You are no Erich von Daniken (Chariots of the Gods.) That is obvious, yet they are attacking you like you were some carny man selling magic elixir.


    Well, those are my thoughts on the conversation.


    Richard T.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. MountainLion,

      The reason people give me so much grief is because they can. I'm readily accessible here and anyone can post anonymously and say whatever they want. I only don't publish the particularly nasty and inappropriate ones.

      I've been dealing with this odd anti-KRS mentality for over 15 years now and it's actually very interesting. Even these last few posts go back to the same tired old "academic peer review" arguments as if I didn't do it or understand the process. After all these years it boils down to two things that drive the debunkers and skeptical scholars, arrogance and deep-seated fear.

      The arrogance is dripping off every word of their attacks, but it's rooted in fear that I might actually be right. The voluminous evidence has proven the KRS is medieval. They simply don't want to accept the truth, or in the misguided belief of our friend in Sweden, being proven wrong and having his scholarly reputation "destroyed." He'd rather cling to fraudulent evidence and his beliefs than accept the facts and follow them.

      It's mind-boggling at times...

      Delete
  62. People take an oath and swear to tell the truth every time they take the stand in a court of law or take a deposition. This is of course is under the penialty of law to include fines and even jail or both. How many times do we all sign a document to get anything ftom a drivers license to a dog license.

    One of the first ways to telll if ssomeone is being less than honest is if they start by saying: Well, to be perfectly honest..."

    Furthermore, in almost every court case where all that testify take the stard oath, there is almost tow opposite and coflicting sides where at least one side must be liying. I am not attacking you or even disagreeing with you in regard to KRS or hooked X, because most all of what I know about them (or think I know) came from you and your shows. So you are right, I am not an expert in your field or any of the related fields. But, I am well educated, and well informed, but do not consider myself extremly intelegent. But I can say that I do not have a dog in any of your battles on either side.

    What I do have is great deal of time invested in seeking truth and understanding in many areas of the human condition. And what I have found through out life is that when one reacts with such venomous disdain to innocuous iterorrogatories, there usually a reason that is less than honorable.

    I do however do take some offense to the redundancy of claims that Christ was married to a whore and had children with her with less proof than exists for bigfoot and rests soely on your theory of what you call the hooked X.

    BTW: For you to suggest that I or anyone does not deserve or is good enough or smart enough or does not have the credentials to consider their comments or questions is exactly your complaint that you have about your accademic superiors. Don't you thimk that questions and comments can be evaluated purely on content, rather than level of achievement or the color of their skin?




    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous,

      If your point was that just because people take an oath to be truthful doesn’t guarantee honesty you are 100% right. I can only speak for myself, but when I took the oath as a professional geologist in the State Capitol building in the first-ever class of licensed professional geoscientists, it was a very moving experience and something I take great pride in every day. Especially since I was part of a group of geologists who lobbied for years to get this licensing bill passed in Minnesota while many engineers fought against us. In any case, while it doesn’t guarantee honesty, it does ensure accountability if someone is caught going off the rails.

      What drives me crazy is to be constantly criticized and attacked for simply doing my work like I’ve always done. In this case, I happened to tread on a sacred paradigm of history that certain scholars and skeptics guard with an almost maniacal ferocity. I’m continually amazed at the lack of objectivity and respect for the scientific method. I thought people would be excited about the KRS being a genuine medieval artifact, but instead my work has been continually criticized and attacked without any tangible facts or legitimate evidence to refute it. I quickly learned I wasn’t the first to experience this kind of treatment and have tried to understand what was behind this bizarre behavior.

      I now know the fundamental reason has nothing to do with science or research methodology, it has everything to do with the human condition. The current situation I’m dealing with involves two former colleagues, one thought to be the top in his field, who have committed intentional fraud. It isn’t the first time this has happened with the KRS, but this situation is especially egregious, but we are currently dealing with it.

      Under normal circumstances I would let anyone and everyone have access to the peer reviews. This is hardly a normal situation as evidenced by a simple Google search of my name. One of the first hits is a link to a debunker who cleverly implies that I intentionally misrepresented my academic credentials knowing full well his comments are intentionally misleading at best. Because of this blog I have received numerous emails and phone calls attacking me personally and in a couple of cases making threats to my family. Doug Weller, a Wikipedia editor in the UK continues to sanitize pages that deal with any pre-Columbian artifacts and sites that challenge the established historical paradigm. It’s wrong and I simply don’t trust anonymous posters not to intentionally misuse the information. Sorry, but until the intellectual landscape changes I’m being careful with who has access to this information.

      With regard to the Jesus and Mary Magdalene situation, you’ve made it quite clear you are driven by faith and therefore cannot be objective in this discussion. Let’s move on.

      I can certainly and do evaluate questions and comments on their own merit. Fire away…

      Delete
    2. Scott, apparently our friend in the UK, Doug Weller, is able to make spur-of-the-moment decisions about the "reliability" of new information coming to Wiki about our historic document, the KRS. I guess he is the one making the decisions about how Wiki's readers will approach the KRS, and this is not good, I agree. I tried several times to post new information tonight and included a citation with a PDF, but it wasn't good enough in the "reliability" department, I guess, even though it is archived with the MN Historical Society. Anyway, if you want, your readers can see the PDF about locating the "lake with 2 skerries" here:

      https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/48abc797-a9d4-4a51-b736-a8981413eb7d

      Also, you and your readers can see a PDF of the Norse Code-stone I recently found, at my updated website. I updated my views about the KRS being a Christian document, but not necessarily a Catholic document, as you tend to believe. That was a tough one.

      www.hallmarkemporium.com/kensingtonrunestone

      Thanks for all you do to help keep the KRS in view.

      - Gunn

      Delete
  63. The church and science can and do mix. Kind of like oil and water, but Einstein saw no conflict with the two. Even the Cath. Church has taken a turn on the issue (mostly out of necessity thanks to brave people like yourself).

    But, you can not attack the very foundation of the faith of over one billion people, and expect to ne greeted with open arms (no matter how the facts stack up).

    Just ask any Templer you might run into.

    There is little doubt that the Church started out with good intentions with Christ as its foundation to give people hope for salvation.

    It did not take long for this to turn into a tool to control the masses, power and wealth.

    You are not attacking the Church and its corruption. You are questioning the very foundation of the faith of over one billon people.

    Mayne you are a head of your time, and rushing the inevitable?

    I have a great deal of respect and even a little admiration for you and and your work.

    Iam just having a problem figuring out your true motives (and that is my problem, not yours).

    I thank you for taking the time and having the patience to help me understand.

    The up side for you is that as you do this in an open forum, you ate also helping others to understand.

    Thanks for your help and do not look at my questions as attacks. Look at them as an opportunity to help others learn and understand.

    My best to you and yours, good day!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Anonymous,

      I agree that faith (not the Catholic Church in its present state) and science can co-exist as long as one does not try to impose its will on the other. Science is the foundation upon which the modern world is built, can anybody function properly anymore if they leave their cellphone at home?

      You clearly have my motives confused. From the beginning of this journey I have only been seeking the truth behind the questions surrounding the Kensington Rune Stone. The evidence trail led me straight to the Templar’s and Jerusalem. Never in my wildest dreams did I think the origin of the Hooked X would be found carved on the lid of the Jesus ossuary. This discovery has answered some questions and generated many more. My journey is not about attacking any person or any faith, it is simply about seeking answers and finding truth. As a forensic scientist it’s what I do.

      I have always known the truth about the Catholic Church in my own mind so I am not questioning anything in that regard. The discoveries myself and many others have made are not about us questioning the faith of billions of people, it is those discoveries that are forcing the billion people, like you, to question that faith.

      Incidentally, the leadership of the medieval Templar’s knew all about the truth we are now uncovering.

      Delete
  64. I took a break from work after lunch to read some websites on the KRS. I wondered why people were so uptight about Kentucky Rotisserie Sausages and then realized that you were having a tissy about the Kensington Rune Stone. Most of the authors of the websites were convinced that they were right and everyone else was wrong.

    One just can't be anal about the subject in saying that a particular letter is or isn't authentic. The rune may have only been used in one fjord or earldom. There was never a single runic system at any one time. Scandinavia was subdivided into many earldoms that had their own dialects and version of runic writing. There were 8 men from Gotland. They spoke a different language than Oslo, Bergen, Trondeheim, Skane, Goteborg and Uppsala. There is no telling how many dialects were originally in Norge (Norway.) Even today, people in Skane pronounce Swedish very differently than those in northern Sweden.

    Seriously, it would be a much more positive use of this website, if people would talk about the alternative scientific methods of determining the age of stone. That is a big headache in my line of work. Bricks we can often date by ingredients and degree of vitrification. Fieldstone walls are a bear to date.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MountainLion,

      Sometimes I wish 99% of what has been published about the Kensington Rune Stone by the so-called "scholars" was discarded. Most of it right up to the latest book by David Krueger, is of little if any value. These publications present no new factual evidence and serve as nothing more than bully pulpits for scholars to tell us about their beliefs.

      Real progress and eventually consensus will come when the discussion can be solely about the factual evidence.

      Delete
  65. Here is another thing. Remember me mentioning a couple of weeks ago that we had found multiple, collaborated accounts that the Christian Norse living in Wexford, Waterford and Dublin were kicked out of Ireland for religious reasons just before the time that KRS scholars are placing Norse in North America? Their Christian beliefs were similar to the Osoreigh, living to the west. We also have found multiple monastic accounts of these Norse ferrying persecuted Gaelic Christians to Witmannsland across the Atlantic.

    Everybody is quoting experts from universities in Uppsala, Roskilde, Bergen and Oslo. What if the Norse in Ireland, because of being a mixture of several Scandinavian regions, plus eastern Scotland, had evolved their own hybrid runic system so that their Anglo-Norman oppressors couldn't read their communications? In that case, the opinions of scholars in Uppsala or wherever would be meaningless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MountainLion. Your comment reminds me of a visit to a cathedral in Spain that for me was a Templar hotbed. Was very disappointed that it was the only Church I have been in worldwide that did not allow photos. I was even more upset when I looked up at the gate which blocked the entrance to the main altar and there was a dedication to Isis in English. English? What? I can read it. Bought the tourist books outside hoping to find pictures of this in it. Nothing of course. Googling it didn't get me any pictures either. But researching did find that the church considered English the lowest of all the languages and a priest would never be able to read it let alone the congregation. Communication in plain sight but meaningless to those in that time period.
      Kathy

      Delete
    2. Kathy,

      Most often the "no-photos" policy is meant to encourage visitors to buy books, etc., in the gift store. One has to wonder why some places like you describe, don't allow photos or offer any for purchase. It could indeed be to minimize things that certain people find offensive or threatening to their beliefs.

      Hard to know for sure, but the last time I went to Rosslyn Chapel they had instituted a "no photos" policy. The reasoning I was told was for safety, but in the same breath I was directed to the gift shop.

      Good thing I took lots of photos the visit before...

      Delete
    3. Scott,
      Glad you got lots of photos before clampdown.
      Often lack of respect with tourists flashbulbs has brought restrictions. But haven't experienced that in churches.But money good incentive to disallow. As usual photos offered but not the ones I would have taken. Toledo Cathedral had lots of gems. Most interesting dedication on high altar. A black Madonna as well I believe. But the most interesting was the Room of Ornaments and Robes. Robes covered in Templar crosses as well as the skull and crossbones. Not just a few of dem bones. Several covered in it. Thought it was rather bold statement for an ecclesiastical garment. Never seen anything close since. And I couldn't take pictures. Of them or info sheet. Unfortunately a lot of the cathedral was under restoration at the same time so limited access. And time was limited being with a group.
      An octagonal room. As I pull out my souvenier book I notice the floor plan in one of the chapels has a blatant Templar cross incorporated into the design. Off the cloister even though no monastic order. Of course built after 1307.
      Had myself a good laugh in the streets when leaving and all the Templar and Egyptian paraphernalia for sale. Everyone in on it including the clergy. But not the guidebooks...nor traditional scholars.
      And I would really like to know the dates of those intriguing robes. That was 2003 and google has gotten me nowhere all these years. Have you heard of or seen those robes in your skull and crossbones ventures?
      Kathy

      Delete
  66. Hi Scott, I thought I'd try an experiment with Doug Weller, that Wikipedia editor from outside America who wants to interfere with our true history over here. I just posted this Wiki addition to the KRS...let's see how long it stays up and what his reason might be for taking it down:

    "In 2015, Bob Voyles, a KRS historian and researcher from Bloomington, MN, claimed to have discovered the elusive "lake with 2 skerries" referred to in the inscription on the KRS. A PDF of his findings was recently received and archived by the Minnesota Historical Society, as well as several area historical societies. Based on field notes information in a book by Hjalmar Holand, Voyles claims he was able to locate the exact finding spot of a medieval Scandinavian battle weapon called the Erdahl Axe, and this axe was discovered buried like a time capsule in 1894 on the west bank of Davidson Lake--as backed up by a legal affidavit signed by the landowner. This lake has 2 skerries and it is located an actual day's journey north from Runestone Hill, up the Chippewa River. In essence, a portion of the inscription on the KRS has been verified as likely being true."

    It seems like some information could be added into Wiki KRS from Alice Kehoe's book, which could cast some favorable light on the subject.

    Don't let those hidebound, fringe-thinking academic types get you down. Long live the KRS!

    - Gunn

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gunn,

      It's a crime what Weller is doing with Wiki and something needs to be done. This situation is a classic example of willful abuse of power that impacts potentially millions of people and is simply wrong.

      I would love to see a groundswell of people complain directly to the site, but as I've witnesses myself he simply ignores complaints and continues on with the deception.

      Maybe we do an episode on television about this problem?

      Delete
    2. Hi Scott, yes, I think public pressure might do some good for Wikipedia and Weller to clean up their acts. I suppose one could find out where they are headquartered and do some sidewalk picketing. Picketing can be very effective. Maybe internet picketing of some kind, such as prompted by a TV show exposing Wikipedia’s blatant bias of things history-related, would be effective. I believe truth-in-history is a good cause—as I was a teenager in the ‘60’s, and brought up in a time of public protest and activism…though not against our military. (We can blame “Horse-face Kerry” for some of that protest against returning vets who had served honorably.)

      MountainLion, those are some interesting thoughts about the Norse and Scots, in trying to understand more about this exploratory transition period. I think we see Norse in MN about a half-century after the split-up of the Templars and the Catholic Church, and Scots around the Newport Tower on the East Coast about a half-century later, around 1400. It does seem like the style of runic use—including the use of the Hooked X—would give clues about the man who carved the KRS and the man who later carved the Maine runestones. It would be nice to learn more about this transition period between roughly 1350 and 1400, insofar as associations and exchanges among Scandinavian and Scottish groups.

      This fifty years seems to represent a unique period of time involving a transition of mapping knowledge and an ability having to do with far-flung exploration. One thing that seems to connect much of this transition together is “Mr. Wolter’s Hooked X,” which I now see actually helps to dispel the notion that the Catholic Church was involved with either the KRS or the East Coast runestones…if the Hooked X does indeed represent the symbol of a group of people no longer friendly with the Catholic Church. So, if I understand what you are saying, Scott, we may see the presence of Christians in this medieval American setting, but not Christians from the Catholic Church. Catholics would show up later as the French.

      Maybe the Hooked X symbol, for its core purpose during this half-century period of time, was used to help distinguish between Catholics and other Christians. So, maybe the Hooked X during medieval times was a non-Catholic “Christian symbol,” possibly designating a certain order of monks, and from a particular Scandinavian location, for example—as I think the blog host has been saying all along, if I understand this possible chain of events correctly.

      Anyway, thanks, MountainLion, for provoking some thoughts about this interesting time of transition, when the earlier Scandinavian exploration attempts were apparently renewed by Scottish elements, although seemingly in vain except for some foggy history trying to form into something more tangible than exists today. But, it is pleasant to watch some of the fog slowly lifting, such as on this blog.

      Thanks, Scott, for offering a well-mannered blog and for putting up a blog heading about runes and the Hooked X. I believe you have made an even stronger case for the Hooked X being vital to understanding medieval American history, as it relates to those who used this mysterious symbol for the perplexing and seemingly dual purposes of secrecy, yet attempting to identify just who the “Hooked X People” were. Exactly who they were for this half-century transition period would be a good answer to know more about!

      - Gunn

      Delete
    3. Gunn,

      I think the simplest way to think about the KRS people is what Alan Butler, Bill Mann, Steve St. Clair and my wife Janet like to call the "Venus Families." They embraced the ancient faith of Monotheistic Dualism that first brought to world knowledge and prominence in Egypt by Pharaoh Akhenaten. This faith is the antithesis of Roman Catholicism and the ideology that was vehemently opposed by the Venus Families. Their opposition wasn’t overt, they went about it in a highly subversive and intelligent way.

      It's a complicated story that I'm hoping to flesh out in a new series. One way or another we’ll get it out there. Let’s see what happens.

      Delete
  67. http://philipcoppens.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-new-inquisition.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dave,

      This is a great article and highlights the very issue we are discussing right here and now. Wiki Weller is so cavalier in his attitude it’s only a matter of time before he is comes crashing down.

      Too bad Phil is no longer here to weigh in…

      Delete
  68. "Wiki-leaks only what it wiki-likes"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      Boy, isn't that the truth...

      Delete
  69. Yes, but it could also be title of the show/episode?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      We'll come up with something appropriate and good for a show title; I can promise you that.

      Delete
  70. Update; " WHY Wiki-leaks only what Wiki-Weller Wants" ???

    ...anyway, you get the idea.

    peace-out

    ReplyDelete
  71. There is hope on the horizon...do not lose faith. These people know their on the short leash and they have no credibility. A person who has a lot to say about this is listed below and he is a very important figure to be read and studied. This may seem to be off-topic but I don't think so as he questions "peer review" and those who have corrupted the system to protect political boundaries and in the article below calls out the "blind peer review" as "non-scientific"...And yes, he is published international in many many languages. So to say he is "off topic" is again closing the argument and relevance. He is the topic.

    "The credibility of science rests on the widespread assumption that results are replicable, and that high standards are maintained by anonymous peer review. These pillars of belief are crumbling....published in no less then "Nature"..Sept 2015.

    http://sciencesetfree.tumblr.com/

    http://www.sheldrake.org/about-rupert-sheldrake/blog/the-replicability-crisis-in-science

    http://www.sheldrake.org/

    https://www.facebook.com/RupertSheldrake/

    if anthropology and archaeology want to carry the title of "science", they have violated all of the rules to call themselves that. Just me musing this AM...

    ReplyDelete
  72. here is a second posting regarding this. its also why, ---my take---, is Scott needs to get rid of the detractors.

    "These self-appointed gatekeepers of the dominant paradigm proudly call themselves skeptics, but reveal themselves as fundamentalists who dismiss any evidence that challenges their belief system."

    "Veteran investigative journalist, Sharyl Attkisson breaks down the phenomenon of astroturf, i.e.,the fake "grassroots movements" of trolls funded by political, corporate, or other special interests, who form a phalanx which very effectively manipulate and distort media messages, especially on the Internet, and on Wikipedia in particular."

    http://www.skepticalaboutskeptics.org/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dave,

      It's obvious the trolls are being funded by entities that benefit from keeping people in the dark. They are clever in their attacks, but their Achilles heel has always they simply don't have the evidence to prevail.

      There are many who have much to lose by the KRS and other artifacts being real because they alter the true history of not just North America, but indeed the world. The victor this time will finally be the truth.

      The "Wiki Weller's" of the world will ultimate be brought down. Wait and see...

      Delete
  73. I agree with you Scott. Weller has no business editing American history topics on Wikipedia - particularly local history sites. In 2012, during the months leading up to your premier, someone edited everyone of the North Georgia county Wikipedia sites to delete all references to the Creek Indians and to Creek archaeological sites. That included three National Historic Landmarks. I had nothing to do with the original articles. Most were written by local chambers of commerce. When I replaced the paragraphs that had been deleted, Weller deleted what I added back and then sent me an email that I would be banned from Wikipedia for life, if I edited another article.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MountainLion,

      There were many efforts to curtail and buzz-kill certain episodes prior to their airing during the first three seasons of the show. Those efforts largely failed and in some cases back-fired. I've always believed and still do that sooner or later the truth always rises to the surface and it will this time too.

      Weller simply needs to be called out for the wrong he is doing. I implore everyone to go onto Wiki and make the appropriate changes and save those changes and inappropriate deletions and excuses he offers up. That will serve as evidence is and when his trial date comes. I've saved all of mine.

      Delete
  74. I guess what I am really trying to say, by adding in the possibility of Irish Norse being the people you are tracking in North America, is this. It is very dangerous to propose a specific theory about the past and then fight off all other possibilities, like I see many of the KRS pro and con web sites. In historical research, people tend to see what they want to see.

    Everyone of our most important discoveries (except the lost Migration Legend) at the People of One Fire, were neither expected or even sought for. I was looking for 17th century Sephardic mining villages, when I stumbled onto Track Rock. For many decades I had assumed that he proof of Maya immigration to North America would be found near the ocean.

    I was looking for the footprints of villages visited by William Bartram, when I stumbled upon the ruins of Fort Caroline, which had been lost since the late 1500's. I was curious why the Native houses at Etowah Mounds in Georgia were similar to houses I had seen under construction in Vera Cruz, when I discovered that the word for house was the same in Totonac, Itza Maya and Creek languages. That lead to the realization that about 1/3 Itsate Creek words are Itza Maya or Totonac. etc, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  75. I, for one, have decided to refer to these self-appointed skeptics by what they have become, if in fact they are representing a false take on very publicly presented history: they are now "fringe skeptics."

    If someone presenting himself as a professional and wise is standing on the side of history lies instead of history truth, that person is on the fringe, the way I see it. So, in effect, some of these nuisance skeptics have reduced themselves down to what they are accusing others of: being on the fringe of the truth. This would be hilarious if it were not also so damaging to history-truth, in this case American history truth about Scandinavians visiting a future America well before Columbus ever set sail.

    I've never cared for intellectual gate-keeping, but keeping the gate closed to true history does seem to be a social crime. Many intelligent scholars over the years have believed in and contributed to the understanding of the KRS, but Wikipedia is even now distorting that fact by not including on the KRS's Wiki page such material supporting the stone's genuineness. To those who wholeheartedly believe the KRS to be genuine, excluding the voices of past and present credible scholars is inexcusable and very much goes against our American way.

    - Gunn

    ReplyDelete
  76. When one claims that his/her work has been properly reviewed by his/her academic peers consistantly and repeatedly, but refuses to make them available or even provide references to said reviews there is in fact a problem. If something is indeed a fact, and claims it is a fact, but will not provide evidence to it in fact being a fact, he/she can expect very few people to accept it as a fact, whether or not it is a fact or fiction becomes moot.

    Just because Pluto is not considered a planet any longer and it is considered fact because it is well documented, by definition it is no longer considered a planet. But try to
    tell that to many that still do not accept it as fact. So, fact or not is moot, if it is not an accepted fact.

    Even if, Scott is correct (and I lean toward he is correct) and it is/was reviewed properly. It will make little difference, if it is rejected by leaders and over a billion followers because they rely on faith, not facts.


    ReplyDelete
  77. Explorer D. said:

    "...Scott needs to get rid of the detractors."

    The fact that Scott does not think like that makes him a true America Hero even if he does not succeed because even though he has stated that there have threats, he is brave enough to march forward without the desirer to to do harm or censor others that think differently. That is what seperates true Americans like Scott from people like you, ICEES & KNOTZES.

    Right now people (even those that don't agree) are listening to Scott. The minute he stops listening, is the moment people will stop listening to him. The big problem Scott has is he needs to find a way to get people to not only listen, but to HEAR what he is saying. As long as he continues to conduct himself as a professional he will continue to increase his chance to acheive his goals.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I appreciate the kind words and you are right that many people are now listening, and a large group of people are hearing what I, and many others, are saying. Unfortunately, many of the people we would like to HEAR the information have the headphones of bias covering their ears.

      Delete
  78. Anonymous,

    My peer reviewed geological work has been out there for the world to review for over a decade. All questions and comments have been addressed and the results published. As I’ve said repeatedly, any qualified individuals who identify themselves and who want to delve deeper into the details of my work are welcome to contact me and I will work with them.

    If qualified scholars and skeptics want to step up to the plate and conduct themselves professionally and in the proper scientific way, then let's do it. If not, then please stop wasting everyone's time here with empty complaints and accusations.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Scott, thanks for the idea of moving towards activism. I just filed a complaint against Wikipedia through the MN/ND BBB Wise Giving Alliance, since Wikipedia is a non-profit. Here is the meat of the complaint, in case anyone wants to use it to file his or her own complaint somewhere.

    "In my view, Wikipedia is being lopsided on its Kensington Runestone page, and a Mr. Weller from the UK seems to be primarily responsible for this continuing distortion of our American history. The Wikipedia page will not allow for past and present scholarly opinions in favor of the runestone's authenticity, summarily deleting any past or new information in favor of the stone's authenticity. So, in effect, Wikipedia is fostering false, incomplete and inaccurate American history, apparently because the Kensington Runestone's genuineness is a threat to some foreigners who want to control a distorted view of American and European history. Excluding pertinent source material from past and present scholars is causing a distortion of history, and I feel that Wikipedia is guilty of what amounts to an abuse of power, in creating this outrageous social crime."

    Scott, maybe if enough KRS enthusiasts vent their anger, the runestone's Wikipedia page will become more truthful and free. This has bugged me for years...nice to get it out!

    - Gunn

    ReplyDelete
  80. I think you have missinterrupted my postings. I don't read the noise makers anymore. They are a distraction. I'm interested in the science and the new finds that he has published (books, articles, journals), posted (internet) and televised. As far as personal attacks or comments, that posted is immediately written off and so is the author. I have posted on other forums where your REAL name is on record and so is your address and phone number. Scott has both of mine. In fact, if he wants to call and say "hi", I'm at my desk. Does he have yours. I do feel very privileged to post/comment on this site. I feel there are those who don't...

    Now onto the REAL STUFF, like the work he has done in Madagascar and Goa. I'm dying on the vine here for more information....especially that "fort" and the dendrological reports on the sunken ship (WOW). AND of course, there is that "hunk of silver", oh, sorry, its "lead". That is the biggest piece of internet crap to be put out there. Of course, its silver. Do you really think, for one second, this analysis wasn't peer review BY MINERALOGISTS (a discipline within the umbrella of GEOLOGY) BEFORE PUBLICATION. I bet they knew the chemical content down to the atom (that includes the % of impurities, etc). Really.....And then there is the Hooked X/Tau symbol. my my....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dave,

      well said, there is so much exciting legitimate stuff happening right now it's just amazing. There are many more medieval manuscripts we're plowing through that are revealing Hooked X's and evidence related to the North American rune stones. It's such a shame we can't get any open-minded scholars in the relevant disciplines to recognize and seize the opportunity that's just sitting there waiting.

      Delete
    2. Are there more then just the "C" documents and the manuscripts from Iceland that I should be sitting on the edge of my seat.....

      Delete
    3. Dave,

      Actually, the C-Document alone is ground-breaking if it fully vets out. There is a LOT more that has yet to be revealed, but the new material needs to be vetted properly and we have essentially zero scholarly help from anyone who can be trusted to be objective.

      We'll get through it regardless!

      Delete
    4. Dave,

      In the “C” Documents - I can’t wait not only to find what the Knights Templar found by excavating under Temple Mount but also to find out about the trip to North America by the Knights Templar in the late twelvth century to find ancient scrolls brought to the continent in the first or second century. Also the identity and story of the Native American woman the Knights Templar brought back to her home in the Panther Mountain impact area.
      I wonder who wrote those scrolls and what were on those scrolls?

      p@

      Delete
  81. As a second posting regarding the publishing of the "peer review" documents. Unless you have the appropriate licensing, degrees, etc., its his complete right to regulate the information. Now if you have the "like minded" standards of Scott and acknowledge and sign the "non-disclosure" documents (BTW, I worked in engineering/architect offices), this is your basic professional standard. I've been retired for almost 6 years now and I'm still under "non-disclosure" clauses from my working career. So any discussion regarding this is off the table. Been there, done that, and still living it.....

    ReplyDelete
  82. Well, aren't you just special? I always thought that artifacts, including manuscripts, documents and other important historical items, regardless of who discoveres them belong to the gov't. This would mean that they belong to EVERYONE. To restrict acsess to them for safe keeping is one thing, but to restrict knowledge and information about their existence is criminal. And any law, regulation or restrictions are unlawful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      I don't think you understand what Explorer Dave is talking about. The written peer reviews of my geological work on the KRS, and my written responses, are private correspondence that belong to me and will only become public information if I choose to do so.

      The government has nothing to do in this situation, but I agree that historical artifacts and related materials do belong to EVERYONE. Once the Kensington Rune Stone becomes accepted as the genuine artifact that it is, then EVERYTHING with regard to all documentation related to it will change.

      Delete
  83. Scott, Ex.Dave...

    Why did slave owners not want young slaves to learn how to read?

    Why do you think land owners did not want women and common folk to vote?

    Why do think the tally-ban blow up schools?

    ...the same reasons why you are not recognized by your academic superiors.

    ...AND THE SAME REASON WHY YOU THINK YOU ARE BETTER THAN ANYONE ELSE THAT IS NOT AS "EDUCATED" as YOU THINK YOU ARE
    IN YOUR FIELD.

    This is not meant to be an attack, just an empirical observation based on comments made here by you and your shills.

    But don't worry, you can always censor what you don't like, don't want and can't handle.

    I still respect your work and you as a person. I just don't understand how you can be upset at others because they think they are better than you, when you think you are batter than everyone else left.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      Academic superiors? You think, that I think, I’m better educated than anyone else in my field? When did I ever say that? I’m sorry, but this post doesn’t make any sense. Calling people who agree with my point of view “shills”, doesn’t help your point whatever it’s supposed to be. You also don’t have to yell with capital letters; we understand lower case letters just fine.

      Maybe you want to reload and try again?

      Delete
  84. "Scott WolterNovember 10, 2015 at 7:27 AM
    Lottie,

    That's a good question, but to my knowledge the answer is no. However, across the street from it's present location is a tiny park with a roughly 30-foot tall stone obelisk in the center. It's a WWII memorial as I recall and that was where I wanted the Stone to be put. I also suggested some fun shadow play with the obelisk and the stone, but the city felt that park was too small and they're probably right."

    -----******------

    I think the above post shows how Scott's mind works. If he is willing to go to all of that trouble to distort historical facts for his own amusement, I wonder what he would be willing to do if he had motives of value, fame or valor?

    Things that make one say:

    Hummmm?




    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,

      Hummmm? So, just what historical facts am I supposed to be distorting? Value, fame or valor? I'm sorry, but the posts coming in tonight make little if any sense. Are you guys having party with adult beverages and decide to have some silly fun on my blog?

      Delete
    2. Not having fun. All caps is out of line. Once again, you have responded as a professional, and that is a part of why I have a great deal of respect for you.

      Everytime I or anyone else post cah-cah like that and you resond as a profeessional level-headed person, you gain more respect and credibility.

      ...and that is as close to an appology as you will get from me today.

      I have no doubt that you feel like responding to me and others is a waste of your time. The truth is that it shows you are willing to take the time to help others better understand.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous,

      That's a pretty damn professional response yourself pal. Well done.

      Delete
  85. Well thank you. Some times you gotta poke da bear to get his attention. You understand why the work you do is important, and I think I know. Without it being explained and even questioned every once in a while, others may miss it. And let's face it, no matter how impotant and significant what you discover is, it will remain undiscoveted by history. That is unless you can communicate it to others (that matter) in a way that is understandable to those that don't matter.

    Win or lose, sometime how the battle itself is fought, picks the true winner in the long run. I think they call it "history".

    The only problem with that is that it is always the winner that gets to document history. If you are smart enough to figure out how to resolve that problem you...(?).

    (...I don't know, I am not that smart)

    ReplyDelete
  86. Scott, this is from Wikipedia’s lead into the Kensington Runestone:

    The inscription purports to be a record left behind by Scandinavian explorers in the 14th century (internally dated to the year 1362). There has been a drawn-out debate on the stone's authenticity, but the scholarly consensus has classified it as a 19th-century hoax since it was first examined in 1910, with some critics directly charging the purported discoverer Ohman to have fabricated the inscription,[2] although there remains a local community who remain convinced of the stone's authenticity.[3]
    ___________________________________

    Scott, under “Academic Consensus,” on the Wikipedia page “Identifying Reliable Sources,” it says the following:

    The statement that all or most scientists or scholars hold a certain view requires reliable sourcing that directly says that all or most scientists or scholars hold that view. Otherwise, individual opinions should be identified as those of particular, named sources. Editors should avoid original research especially with regard to making blanket statements based on novel syntheses of disparate material. Stated simply, any statement in Wikipedia that academic consensus exists on a topic must be sourced rather than being based on the opinion or assessment of editors.
    _________________

    Scott, it looks to me like Mr. Weller, as an editor of Wikipedia, may be guilty of synthesizing disparate material together as a way of presenting bias into the KRS discussion, if he is controlling the KRS lead information. The lead-in on the KRS talks about a “scholarly consensus,” considering it a hoax, though only a few individual examples appear to be noted. This is misleading and could be a basis for trying to get Wikipedia Editor Weller canned.

    Also, look what presently follows at the end of the KRS lead-in statement, as a note:

    "There is a small clique of Americans who swear to the stone's authenticity. They are mainly natural scientists of Scandinavian descent with no knowledge of linguistics, and they have large numbers of adherents."

    …small clique of Americans?

    Scott, they don’t even seem to appreciate you as a German!

    - Gunn

    ReplyDelete
  87. Going to go off topic here...but not really probably. Mountain Lion continues to bring up buzz words for me.In looking for pre-Columbian contact in the Americas something that has caught my eye is a traditional dance performed by the Maya to this day called the ribbon dance. Apparently survived the Spanish conquest and they were allowed to retain this dance and perform it during Catholic festivals. Continue to perform it as a traditional dance in the Yucatan area. Believe reading sources have it originating in Hildago. Just beyond Vera Cruz. Performed during equinox ceremonies at Chichen Itza. Whose been coming through Vera Cruz? Templar rumors surround that port. Anyone who has ever performed or watched a Maypole dance will recognize it as being the exact same dance. Weaving patterns of ribbon around the pole. Just a coincidence they were performing the same style of dance as the Celtic culture before the Spanish arrival? Or is there some pre-Columbian contact from Norse/Scottish/Irish/English or Templar persons and a cultural exchange program? Just a coincidence...
    Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  88. http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/03/24/where-did-chief-joseph-get-his-mesopotamian-tablet-24717

    ReplyDelete